South Sudan prepares for the next rainy season

South Sudan prepares for the next rainy season  A Nuer family in search of medicine and food in 2014. In South Sudan, the United Nations refugee agency is warning of the urgent need to protect vulnerable populations from flooding and displacement, as the rainy season expected in May approaches.  “The floods brought us here ,” says flood victim Angelina Peter. “Our villages were submerged by water. We arrived here with nothing. All our belongings were washed away. “This is the second time there have been floods in 2 years. In 2020, it wasn't too bad, because we built dikes."  The country experienced the worst flooding in its history in 2021 , which affected more than 835,000 people according to the UN. Thousands of hectares were flooded, preventing all forms of agriculture and decimating livestock.  "We care about communities struggling to withstand the impact of climate change and extreme weather events, we need to advocate for development actors to provide direct support to communities ," says Andrew Harper, UNHCR's Special Adviser to the UNHCR. High Commissioner for Climate Action.  "These flood waters have been there for two or three years and they are not going down. What will happen when we see the next trains arriving in the next 2 or 3 months?"  Such events that could worsen in the future, as climate change makes extremes the norm and no longer the exception.

A Nuer family in search of medicine and food in 2014.
In South Sudan, the United Nations refugee agency is warning of the urgent need to protect vulnerable populations from flooding and displacement, as the rainy season expected in May approaches.

“The floods brought us here ,” says flood victim Angelina Peter. “Our villages were submerged by water. We arrived here with nothing. All our belongings were washed away. “This is the second time there have been floods in 2 years. In 2020, it wasn't too bad, because we built dikes."

The country experienced the worst flooding in its history in 2021 , which affected more than 835,000 people according to the UN. Thousands of hectares were flooded, preventing all forms of agriculture and decimating livestock.

"We care about communities struggling to withstand the impact of climate change and extreme weather events, we need to advocate for development actors to provide direct support to communities ," says Andrew Harper, UNHCR's Special Adviser to the UNHCR. High Commissioner for Climate Action.

"These flood waters have been there for two or three years and they are not going down. What will happen when we see the next trains arriving in the next 2 or 3 months?"

Such events that could worsen in the future, as climate change makes extremes the norm and no longer the exception.
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