US Secretary of State Blinken attends news conference in Washington

Washington accuses Moscow of committing war crimes in Ukraine and warns Beijing against helping Russia  US Secretary of State Blinken attends news conference in Washington US Secretary of State Anthony Blinken considered that Russian attacks on civilians in Ukraine constitute "war crimes", while warning China against helping Moscow militarily, prior to a phone call between the two countries' presidents.  Blinken said - in a press conference held on Thursday - that deliberately targeting civilians is a war crime, explaining that legal procedures to reach such a formal accusation are still ongoing.  "Our experts document and examine possible war crimes committed in Ukraine," the minister added, pledging to share the fruits of this work with international investigations aimed at "holding those responsible to account."  On Wednesday, US President Joe Biden described his Russian counterpart, Vladimir Putin, as a "war criminal", an accusation that Moscow considered "unforgivable."  In this context, the foreign ministers of the Group of Seven countries warned - in a joint declaration on Thursday - that the perpetrators of war crimes in Ukraine will be held accountable before the international judiciary.  The ministers of the German-led group this year expressed their satisfaction with the ongoing investigations and evidence-gathering, including the work of the Prosecutor of the International Criminal Court in Ukraine.  Western countries accuse the Russian army of bombing civilians, in its military operations, which it has been waging since February 24 in Ukraine.  The United Nations General Assembly overwhelmingly adopted a resolution demanding Russia's immediate withdrawal from Ukraine, in a strong rebuke of the Russian offensive by the vast majority of the world's nations.  On the other hand, the Russian delegate to the Security Council, Vasily Nebenzia, accused - during a council session - the West of fueling the conflict and pouring oil on the fire through military support for Ukraine, and said that the Ukrainian authorities were preventing the evacuation of civilians.  He added that Mariupol has become a source of misinformation by the Ukrainian regime, as he put it, and pointed out that there are 70 ships in seaports, which he said are unable to leave due to naval mines laid by Ukraine.  In turn, the US ambassador to the United Nations, Linda Thomas Greenfield, said that more than 3 million refugees have been displaced from Ukraine, mostly women and children, causing a devastating humanitarian crisis that is being felt by people all over the world.  The US delegate said - in a speech during an emergency session of the Security Council - that Russia clearly violated international law by violating the sovereignty and territorial integrity of Ukraine, and called on it to immediately comply with the decision of the International Court of Justice to end the war.  US warnings to China On the other hand, the White House said Thursday that US President Joe Biden will hold a phone call today, Friday, with Chinese President Xi Jinping, at a time when Washington has warned that China is considering providing military support to Russia in its war on Ukraine, a step that would lead The gap is widening dramatically between Beijing and the West.  The Biden administration issued warnings, including in public and in private conversations, that Beijing would face dire consequences if it provided support for Russian President Vladimir Putin's war, according to Reuters.  And Foreign Minister Blinken confirmed - in his press conference yesterday - that President Biden will speak with his Chinese counterpart, and he will make it clear that "China will bear responsibility for any measures it takes to support Russian aggression, and we will not hesitate to bear the costs."   Blinken did not clarify what costs China might incur, and Washington has yet to provide evidence for allegations that China has indicated a willingness to help Russia.  Moscow has denied seeking military assistance from China, and the Chinese Foreign Ministry has described the allegations as "disinformation".  White House spokeswoman Jen Psaki described the call as "an opportunity for President Biden to assess President Xi's position."  "The fact that China did not condemn what Russia is doing, and that China did not condemn what Russia is doing in and of itself means a lot," she added.   The call comes after US National Security Adviser Jake Sullivan held seven hours of talks in Rome with Chinese diplomat Yang Jiechi on Monday.  During the meeting, Sullivan raised concerns about China's siding with Russia.  A senior Biden administration official said Sullivan had been upfront with Yang about the "potential repercussions and consequences" for Beijing if it offered support to Moscow.  "We have serious concerns about China's siding with Russia. We are watching closely whether China or any other country provides support - militarily, economically or any other support - to Russia," a senior US administration official told Reuters.

Washington accuses Moscow of committing war crimes in Ukraine and warns Beijing against helping Russia

US Secretary of State Anthony Blinken considered that Russian attacks on civilians in Ukraine constitute "war crimes", while warning China against helping Moscow militarily, prior to a phone call between the two countries' presidents.

Blinken said - in a press conference held on Thursday - that deliberately targeting civilians is a war crime, explaining that legal procedures to reach such a formal accusation are still ongoing.

"Our experts document and examine possible war crimes committed in Ukraine," the minister added, pledging to share the fruits of this work with international investigations aimed at "holding those responsible to account."

On Wednesday, US President Joe Biden described his Russian counterpart, Vladimir Putin, as a "war criminal", an accusation that Moscow considered "unforgivable."

In this context, the foreign ministers of the Group of Seven countries warned - in a joint declaration on Thursday - that the perpetrators of war crimes in Ukraine will be held accountable before the international judiciary.

The ministers of the German-led group this year expressed their satisfaction with the ongoing investigations and evidence-gathering, including the work of the Prosecutor of the International Criminal Court in Ukraine.

Western countries accuse the Russian army of bombing civilians, in its military operations, which it has been waging since February 24 in Ukraine.

The United Nations General Assembly overwhelmingly adopted a resolution demanding Russia's immediate withdrawal from Ukraine, in a strong rebuke of the Russian offensive by the vast majority of the world's nations.

On the other hand, the Russian delegate to the Security Council, Vasily Nebenzia, accused - during a council session - the West of fueling the conflict and pouring oil on the fire through military support for Ukraine, and said that the Ukrainian authorities were preventing the evacuation of civilians.

He added that Mariupol has become a source of misinformation by the Ukrainian regime, as he put it, and pointed out that there are 70 ships in seaports, which he said are unable to leave due to naval mines laid by Ukraine.

In turn, the US ambassador to the United Nations, Linda Thomas Greenfield, said that more than 3 million refugees have been displaced from Ukraine, mostly women and children, causing a devastating humanitarian crisis that is being felt by people all over the world.

The US delegate said - in a speech during an emergency session of the Security Council - that Russia clearly violated international law by violating the sovereignty and territorial integrity of Ukraine, and called on it to immediately comply with the decision of the International Court of Justice to end the war.

US warnings to China
On the other hand, the White House said Thursday that US President Joe Biden will hold a phone call today, Friday, with Chinese President Xi Jinping, at a time when Washington has warned that China is considering providing military support to Russia in its war on Ukraine, a step that would lead The gap is widening dramatically between Beijing and the West.

The Biden administration issued warnings, including in public and in private conversations, that Beijing would face dire consequences if it provided support for Russian President Vladimir Putin's war, according to Reuters.

And Foreign Minister Blinken confirmed - in his press conference yesterday - that President Biden will speak with his Chinese counterpart, and he will make it clear that "China will bear responsibility for any measures it takes to support Russian aggression, and we will not hesitate to bear the costs."


Blinken did not clarify what costs China might incur, and Washington has yet to provide evidence for allegations that China has indicated a willingness to help Russia.

Moscow has denied seeking military assistance from China, and the Chinese Foreign Ministry has described the allegations as "disinformation".

White House spokeswoman Jen Psaki described the call as "an opportunity for President Biden to assess President Xi's position."

"The fact that China did not condemn what Russia is doing, and that China did not condemn what Russia is doing in and of itself means a lot," she added.


The call comes after US National Security Adviser Jake Sullivan held seven hours of talks in Rome with Chinese diplomat Yang Jiechi on Monday.

During the meeting, Sullivan raised concerns about China's siding with Russia.

A senior Biden administration official said Sullivan had been upfront with Yang about the "potential repercussions and consequences" for Beijing if it offered support to Moscow.

"We have serious concerns about China's siding with Russia. We are watching closely whether China or any other country provides support - militarily, economically or any other support - to Russia," a senior US administration official told Reuters.


Biden: Putin is a "murderous dictator" and a "thug" waging an immoral war - (video)  Washington: US President Joe Biden described his Russian counterpart, Vladimir Putin, on Thursday as a "murderous dictator."  "The Republic stands shoulder to shoulder against a murderous dictator, a pure thug who is waging an immoral war against the people of Ukraine," Biden said on the occasion of the celebration of "St. Patrick's Day" in Washington today, Thursday. He later added, "Putin is paying a heavy price for his aggression."   On Wednesday, the US president stepped up his rhetoric, describing Putin as a "war criminal" . White House spokeswoman Jen Psaki later said Biden was speaking from the heart.  Biden spoke of a "historic turning point" in light of Russia's aggression against Ukraine, and said that it only happens every several generations.  "I think we are in the midst of a genuine struggle between authoritarian and democratic regimes, and whether or not democracies can survive," the US president said.(dpa)

Biden: Putin is a "murderous dictator" and a "thug" waging an immoral war

Washington: US President Joe Biden described his Russian counterpart, Vladimir Putin, on Thursday as a "murderous dictator."

"The Republic stands shoulder to shoulder against a murderous dictator, a pure thug who is waging an immoral war against the people of Ukraine," Biden said on the occasion of the celebration of "St. Patrick's Day" in Washington today, Thursday. He later added, "Putin is paying a heavy price for his aggression."


On Wednesday, the US president stepped up his rhetoric, describing Putin as a "war criminal" . White House spokeswoman Jen Psaki later said Biden was speaking from the heart.

Biden spoke of a "historic turning point" in light of Russia's aggression against Ukraine, and said that it only happens every several generations.

"I think we are in the midst of a genuine struggle between authoritarian and democratic regimes, and whether or not democracies can survive," the US president said.(dpa)
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