Protests and clashes in Sweden following right-wing determination to burn a copy of the Qur’an

Protests and clashes in Sweden following right-wing determination to burn a copy of the Qur’an 4 policemen were injured as a result of clashes that broke out in a Swedish city between police and demonstrators who came out to protest against a plan by an extremist right-wing movement to burn a copy of the Quran.  Clashes took place in a Swedish city on Friday between police and demonstrators who came out to protest against a plan by an extremist right-wing movement to burn a copy of the Quran, injuring four policemen, according to the authorities.  And the police announced in a statement that four of its members were injured during the clashes in Orebro (central), one of them, along with a civilian, was hit in the head with a stone.  The clashes took place for the second day in a row, Friday, against the backdrop of a gathering of the anti-immigration and anti-Islam "Straam Corse" movement led by the Danish-Swedish Rasmus Paludan.   Three policemen were taken to hospital after clashes erupted in the city of Linkoping on the east coast of Sweden on Thursday, when a demonstration during which a Quran was to be burned had been scheduled to take place.  Two people were arrested during the demonstration.  "We live in a democratic society and one of the most important tasks of the police is to ensure that people can use their constitutional rights to demonstrate and express their opinions," National Police Chief Anders Thornberg said Friday morning in response to Thursday's events.  "The police do not have the right to choose who has this right, but they must always intervene in the event of a violation," he added in a statement.  Baludan has repeatedly sparked controversy in recent years. In November 2020, the French authorities arrested him and deported him.

4 policemen were injured as a result of clashes that broke out in a Swedish city between police and demonstrators who came out to protest against a plan by an extremist right-wing movement to burn a copy of the Quran.

Clashes took place in a Swedish city on Friday between police and demonstrators who came out to protest against a plan by an extremist right-wing movement to burn a copy of the Quran, injuring four policemen, according to the authorities.

And the police announced in a statement that four of its members were injured during the clashes in Orebro (central), one of them, along with a civilian, was hit in the head with a stone.

The clashes took place for the second day in a row, Friday, against the backdrop of a gathering of the anti-immigration and anti-Islam "Straam Corse" movement led by the Danish-Swedish Rasmus Paludan.

Three policemen were taken to hospital after clashes erupted in the city of Linkoping on the east coast of Sweden on Thursday, when a demonstration during which a Quran was to be burned had been scheduled to take place.

Two people were arrested during the demonstration.
"We live in a democratic society and one of the most important tasks of the police is to ensure that people can use their constitutional rights to demonstrate and express their opinions," National Police Chief Anders Thornberg said Friday morning in response to Thursday's events.

"The police do not have the right to choose who has this right, but they must always intervene in the event of a violation," he added in a statement.

Baludan has repeatedly sparked controversy in recent years. In November 2020, the French authorities arrested him and deported him.

The headscarf is a top issue in the electoral campaigns of the French presidential candidates

The issue of the veil is high on the campaign agenda of French presidential candidates, amid pressure from far-right candidate Marine Le Pen to ban it completely. On the other hand, Macron did not ban religious clothing, but he supervised the closure of many mosques and Islamic schools.

The issue of the headscarf has topped the campaign agenda of French presidential candidates, amid pressure from far-right candidate Marine Le Pen to ban it completely in the country with the largest Muslim population in Western Europe.

Le Pen and her rival Emmanuel Macron face a highly competitive run-off on April 24, and both have positions opposing the veil and religious symbols, according to the Associated Press.

Macron is the front-runner in opinion polls, as he seeks a second term as French president.

Macron did not ban religious clothing, but he oversaw the closure of many mosques, schools and Islamic groups, with the help of a special team to root out areas suspected of breeding extremism.

In recent statements, he pointed out that "the issue of the veil is not an obsession" for him.

Macron's government also passed a controversial law last year to combat "separatism," the word used to describe mixing politics with Islam, which is considered dangerous to the value of secularism in France.

For her part, Le Pen calls for a ban on the Islamic headscarf on French streets, describing it as "a uniform imposed over time by people with an extremist view of Islam."

Le Pen sees the veil as a "sign" of Islamic ideology, which she sees as a gateway to extremism.

In 2004 France banned the headscarf in the classroom, and in 2010 it banned the full-face veil in the streets.

Macron, the outgoing president, topped the results of the first round of the presidential elections, with between 27.6 and 29.7% of the votes, and qualified for the second round with his rival Le Pen, who won 23.5 to 24.7% of the votes.

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