Apple warns users of its devices of a serious vulnerability

Apple warns users of its devices of a serious vulnerability  Apple has revealed serious security vulnerabilities in iPhone, iPad and Mac devices that could potentially allow attackers to gain full control of these devices.  And Apple issued two security reports on this problem - the first on Wednesday - although they did not receive wide attention outside the circle of those interested in technology.  The company explained that it is possible that some hackers have taken advantage of this possibility without giving further details, pointing out that this vulnerability could be exploited by malicious Internet software, and added that unidentified researchers informed the company of the existence of the vulnerability.  Apple's interpretation of the vulnerability means that a hacker can gain "full access" to the device, which would allow hackers to impersonate the device's owner and run any program in their name, said Rachel Tobak, CEO of SocialProof Security.  Security experts advised users to update the affected devices, from the iPhone 6s to the latest versions, and that this also be done with many devices of the iPad models, including the fifth generation and later versions.  According to experts, the update should include all iPad Pro and iPad Air 2 models, and Mac computers running MacOS Monterey. iPod models.  Apple did not say in the data it published how or when these vulnerabilities were discovered.  Commercial spyware companies such as Israel's NSO are notorious for identifying and exploiting these flaws, exploiting them in malware that surreptitiously infects smartphones, pulls their contents and monitors targets in real time.  The NSO Group was blacklisted by the US Department of Commerce.  The group's spyware is known to have been used in Europe, the Middle East, Africa and Latin America against journalists, dissidents and human rights activists.  Security researcher Will Stravach said he had not seen any technical analysis of the vulnerabilities that Apple had just patched.  The company has previously acknowledged similar serious flaws, which Stravach estimates have occurred dozens of times, but Apple has also made it clear that it is aware of reports of exploits for such vulnerabilities.

Apple has revealed serious security vulnerabilities in iPhone, iPad and Mac devices that could potentially allow attackers to gain full control of these devices.

And Apple issued two security reports on this problem - the first on Wednesday - although they did not receive wide attention outside the circle of those interested in technology.

The company explained that it is possible that some hackers have taken advantage of this possibility without giving further details, pointing out that this vulnerability could be exploited by malicious Internet software, and added that unidentified researchers informed the company of the existence of the vulnerability.

Apple's interpretation of the vulnerability means that a hacker can gain "full access" to the device, which would allow hackers to impersonate the device's owner and run any program in their name, said Rachel Tobak, CEO of SocialProof Security.

Security experts advised users to update the affected devices, from the iPhone 6s to the latest versions, and that this also be done with many devices of the iPad models, including the fifth generation and later versions.

According to experts, the update should include all iPad Pro and iPad Air 2 models, and Mac computers running MacOS Monterey. iPod models.

Apple did not say in the data it published how or when these vulnerabilities were discovered.

Commercial spyware companies such as Israel's NSO are notorious for identifying and exploiting these flaws, exploiting them in malware that surreptitiously infects smartphones, pulls their contents and monitors targets in real time.

The NSO Group was blacklisted by the US Department of Commerce.

The group's spyware is known to have been used in Europe, the Middle East, Africa and Latin America against journalists, dissidents and human rights activists.

Security researcher Will Stravach said he had not seen any technical analysis of the vulnerabilities that Apple had just patched.

The company has previously acknowledged similar serious flaws, which Stravach estimates have occurred dozens of times, but Apple has also made it clear that it is aware of reports of exploits for such vulnerabilities.
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