Anti-Islam attack on a mosque in central Germany

"Siemens scandal" a Greek-German corruption case continues to anger the street The release of the accused in the Siemens scandal aroused widespread resentment in the Greek street, the details of which date back to the end of the nineties, when the German technology company was implicated in the largest financial corruption operation among the pillars of power in Athens.  At the end of the 1990s, when Athens was preparing to host its Olympic Games in 2004, financial corruption was cooking behind closed doors in the offices of German company Siemens and Greek officials, costing the country's government to waste the equivalent of 2 billion euros in public money.  This scandal waited until 2008 to be revealed, and a series of judicial follow-ups were launched against those involved. While the account of these convicts did not take long, until they were released last month, which sparked a wave of anger among the Greeks, who resented their government for its failure to recover the wasted money.  Release and rage  On Monday, September 26, the Greek authorities released 20 followers of the financial corruption scandal linked to the German "Siemens", including the former head of the company. After they were convicted in 2019, they were sentenced to 15 years in prison.  The court attributed its decision to release the convicts to the statute of limitations that characterizes the case, the first investigation of which dates back to 2004.  This decision sparked great resentment among Greeks, most of whom chose social media to express their anger. On the other hand , the local newspaper "Kathimirny" wrote that the decision left a "bitter taste" in the hearts of the Greeks, and that it is another evidence of "the inability of the political and judicial systems to end a sixteen-year investigation", in the case "unfortunately not an exception to the rule, as political pressures shifted." without holding those involved in scandals of a financial nature to account.  For its part , the Greek newspaper "Dokimanta" reported that the decision to release the accused in the scandal is a "provocation" for the Greek people, who have endured years of austerity due to the financial corruption of politicians. And the Greek member of the European Parliament, Giorgos Kyrtsos , tweeted, "The acquittal of the accused in the Siemens scandal reinforces the image of the regime mired in corruption, where everyone loots the public treasury and interest and launders money."  Details of the Siemens scandal  In the late nineties, the Greek government-owned telecommunications company "OTE" announced offers to develop its network in the country, coinciding with its preparations to organize the Olympic Games hosted by the capital, Athens, in the summer of 2004. This deal was illegally won by the German "Siemens" company, by bribing government officials And personalities with political influence in Greece.  The company paid more than 100 million euros in bribes to figures in the majority and the opposition, especially in the "PASOK" party that was leading the government at the time. The case was revealed only around 2008, when the Public Prosecutor brought charges of receiving bribes and money laundering to officials in Siemens Greece, led by its former director Michalis Christoforakos, following a two-year secret investigation.  This scandal sparked a political storm, and the Greek Parliament announced in 2008 the formation of an investigative committee to broadcast it. The commission acknowledged that this corruption operation cost the Greek government about two billion euros in wasted public money.  The verdict in the case was not issued until 2019, when the Athens Court of First Instance sentenced the defendants to 15 years in prison. Including the former director of the company, who did not spend a single day behind bars, having fled to Germany before he was arrested by the Greek authorities. Anti-Islam attack on a mosque in central Germany Unidentified persons wrote anti-Muslim slogans and insults on the wall of a mosque belonging to the Turkish Islamic Union for Religious Affairs in the German city of Offenbach.  Unidentified persons wrote anti-Muslim expressions and insults on the wall of a mosque belonging to the Turkish Islamic Union for Religious Affairs in Offenbach, Hessen state, central Germany.  A statement issued by the city's police, on Wednesday, stated that it had launched its investigations in order to identify the perpetrators of the anti-Muslim attack, which took place on Saturday morning.  The police demanded eyewitnesses to provide information in order to arrest the perpetrators of the attack, which included insults to Islam and the Prophet Muhammad.  It should be noted that last year, Germany witnessed the occurrence of 662 crimes against Muslims and mosques

Unidentified persons wrote anti-Muslim slogans and insults on the wall of a mosque belonging to the Turkish Islamic Union for Religious Affairs in the German city of Offenbach.

Unidentified persons wrote anti-Muslim expressions and insults on the wall of a mosque belonging to the Turkish Islamic Union for Religious Affairs in Offenbach, Hessen state, central Germany.

A statement issued by the city's police, on Wednesday, stated that it had launched its investigations in order to identify the perpetrators of the anti-Muslim attack, which took place on Saturday morning.

The police demanded eyewitnesses to provide information in order to arrest the perpetrators of the attack, which included insults to Islam and the Prophet Muhammad.

It should be noted that last year, Germany witnessed the occurrence of 662 crimes against Muslims and mosques.

"Siemens scandal" a Greek-German corruption case continues to anger the street

The release of the accused in the Siemens scandal aroused widespread resentment in the Greek street, the details of which date back to the end of the nineties, when the German technology company was implicated in the largest financial corruption operation among the pillars of power in Athens.

At the end of the 1990s, when Athens was preparing to host its Olympic Games in 2004, financial corruption was cooking behind closed doors in the offices of German company Siemens and Greek officials, costing the country's government to waste the equivalent of 2 billion euros in public money.

This scandal waited until 2008 to be revealed, and a series of judicial follow-ups were launched against those involved. While the account of these convicts did not take long, until they were released last month, which sparked a wave of anger among the Greeks, who resented their government for its failure to recover the wasted money.

Release and rage

On Monday, September 26, the Greek authorities released 20 followers of the financial corruption scandal linked to the German "Siemens", including the former head of the company. After they were convicted in 2019, they were sentenced to 15 years in prison.

The court attributed its decision to release the convicts to the statute of limitations that characterizes the case, the first investigation of which dates back to 2004.

This decision sparked great resentment among Greeks, most of whom chose social media to express their anger. On the other hand , the local newspaper "Kathimirny" wrote that the decision left a "bitter taste" in the hearts of the Greeks, and that it is another evidence of "the inability of the political and judicial systems to end a sixteen-year investigation", in the case "unfortunately not an exception to the rule, as political pressures shifted." without holding those involved in scandals of a financial nature to account.

For its part , the Greek newspaper "Dokimanta" reported that the decision to release the accused in the scandal is a "provocation" for the Greek people, who have endured years of austerity due to the financial corruption of politicians. And the Greek member of the European Parliament, Giorgos Kyrtsos , tweeted, "The acquittal of the accused in the Siemens scandal reinforces the image of the regime mired in corruption, where everyone loots the public treasury and interest and launders money."

Details of the Siemens scandal

In the late nineties, the Greek government-owned telecommunications company "OTE" announced offers to develop its network in the country, coinciding with its preparations to organize the Olympic Games hosted by the capital, Athens, in the summer of 2004. This deal was illegally won by the German "Siemens" company, by bribing government officials And personalities with political influence in Greece.

The company paid more than 100 million euros in bribes to figures in the majority and the opposition, especially in the "PASOK" party that was leading the government at the time. The case was revealed only around 2008, when the Public Prosecutor brought charges of receiving bribes and money laundering to officials in Siemens Greece, led by its former director Michalis Christoforakos, following a two-year secret investigation.

This scandal sparked a political storm, and the Greek Parliament announced in 2008 the formation of an investigative committee to broadcast it. The commission acknowledged that this corruption operation cost the Greek government about two billion euros in wasted public money.

The verdict in the case was not issued until 2019, when the Athens Court of First Instance sentenced the defendants to 15 years in prison. Including the former director of the company, who did not spend a single day behind bars, having fled to Germany before he was arrested by the Greek authorities.
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