"It killed about 300 children around the world", "World Health" and experts warn of toxic risks in cough medicines "It killed about 300 children around the world", "World Health" and experts warn of toxic risks in cough medicines

"It killed about 300 children around the world", "World Health" and experts warn of toxic risks in cough medicines

"It killed about 300 children around the world", "World Health" and experts warn of toxic risks in cough medicines  Over the past five months, at least 300 children have died around the world after taking cough medicine.  In response, the World Health Organization (WHO) issued an alert on the products of 14 different medicines for children in Africa, Southeast Asia and Europe.  The cough medicines were contaminated with toxic chemicals ethylene glycol and diethylene glycol, which are used in windshield wiper fluids and engine coolants.  Professor Winston Morgan, a toxicologist from the University of East London, explained why these chemicals are dangerous to humans and how they ended up in the cough syrup.  "These compounds are sometimes found at very low levels as contaminants in many food ingredients and medical solvents. This happens when there are poor manufacturing and testing standards," the expert said.  The lethal dose of chemicals in adults is 1000-1500 milligrams per kilogram.  For a small child who weighs 20 kg, the lethal rate drops to 28 milliliters, or about 6 teaspoons. However, toxicity is also possible with much lower doses taken over several days and weeks. This is why the World Health Organization's safe level for these chemicals is only 0.5 mg per kilogram per day. This equates to 1/15 of a teaspoon per day.  Professor Winston explained that what makes these chemicals so dangerous is that a child consumes a large amount before symptoms of poisoning appear.  To make matters worse, symptoms of ethylene glycol and diethylene glycol poisoning, such as drowsiness, can be misinterpreted as normal in a child with a cough or fever.  "Parents and medical staff may not notice what is wrong until it is too late," the professor continued.  Why are chemicals so toxic in medicines?  Ethylene glycol and diethylene glycol can mix with an enzyme found naturally in the human body, which converts chemicals into a more dangerous compound, known as glyoxylic acid.  "The glyoxylic acid can become concentrated in the kidneys and damage them, leading to death from kidney failure," Winston said.  Normally, the body can regulate the chemical reactions in the body, which means chemicals will never turn into glyoxylic acid. But the paracetamol in cough syrup can dampen the body's ability to control chemical reactions, making the development of glyoxylic acid more likely.  "Children taking paracetamol preparations contaminated with glycol could be at risk," Winston wrote.  He added: "Medicines and other foods contaminated with low levels of ethylene glycol and diethylene glycol may go unnoticed because they do not contain paracetamol."  Professor Winston urged parents to continue using cough medicines with caution, explaining: “Medicines containing paracetamol are usually very safe for children. To avoid cough syrup-related deaths in the future, parents and medical professionals should consider glycol poisoning as a possibility if children start Showing symptoms of intoxication and drowsiness after taking the drug.  Source: The Sun


Over the past five months, at least 300 children have died around the world after taking cough medicine.

In response, the World Health Organization (WHO) issued an alert on the products of 14 different medicines for children in Africa, Southeast Asia and Europe.

The cough medicines were contaminated with toxic chemicals ethylene glycol and diethylene glycol, which are used in windshield wiper fluids and engine coolants.

Professor Winston Morgan, a toxicologist from the University of East London, explained why these chemicals are dangerous to humans and how they ended up in the cough syrup.

"These compounds are sometimes found at very low levels as contaminants in many food ingredients and medical solvents. This happens when there are poor manufacturing and testing standards," the expert said.

The lethal dose of chemicals in adults is 1000-1500 milligrams per kilogram.

For a small child who weighs 20 kg, the lethal rate drops to 28 milliliters, or about 6 teaspoons. However, toxicity is also possible with much lower doses taken over several days and weeks. This is why the World Health Organization's safe level for these chemicals is only 0.5 mg per kilogram per day. This equates to 1/15 of a teaspoon per day.

Professor Winston explained that what makes these chemicals so dangerous is that a child consumes a large amount before symptoms of poisoning appear.

To make matters worse, symptoms of ethylene glycol and diethylene glycol poisoning, such as drowsiness, can be misinterpreted as normal in a child with a cough or fever.

"Parents and medical staff may not notice what is wrong until it is too late," the professor continued.

Why are chemicals so toxic in medicines?

Ethylene glycol and diethylene glycol can mix with an enzyme found naturally in the human body, which converts chemicals into a more dangerous compound, known as glyoxylic acid.

"The glyoxylic acid can become concentrated in the kidneys and damage them, leading to death from kidney failure," Winston said.

Normally, the body can regulate the chemical reactions in the body, which means chemicals will never turn into glyoxylic acid. But the paracetamol in cough syrup can dampen the body's ability to control chemical reactions, making the development of glyoxylic acid more likely.

"Children taking paracetamol preparations contaminated with glycol could be at risk," Winston wrote.

He added: "Medicines and other foods contaminated with low levels of ethylene glycol and diethylene glycol may go unnoticed because they do not contain paracetamol."

Professor Winston urged parents to continue using cough medicines with caution, explaining: “Medicines containing paracetamol are usually very safe for children. To avoid cough syrup-related deaths in the future, parents and medical professionals should consider glycol poisoning as a possibility if children start Showing symptoms of intoxication and drowsiness after taking the drug.

Source: The Sun

The World Health Organization warns of a new pandemic

Richard Peabody, an epidemiologist at the World Health Organization, urged countries around the world to prepare for an outbreak of avian influenza.

In a statement to El Pais newspaper, the scientist warns of the threat of the bird flu pandemic, because the virus that causes it has become able to transmit from one person to another.

He says, "There is a fear that the virus will acquire the ability to transmit from one person to another in a sustainable manner. Therefore, it could cause the spread of a new pandemic, and we must prepare to confront it."

And he adds: Scientists are following the development of viruses and are working to devise anti-vaccines that are ready upon request. But the current outbreak of bird flu is caused by a special type of virus A (H5N1).

The epidemiologist recommends vigilance and attention, especially for workers in poultry farms. He also urged not to touch dead or dying birds, as well as other animals.

The Russian virologist Anatoly Altstein had announced earlier that the bird flu virus was a serious threat. Therefore, scientists have to work hard so that it does not acquire the ability to pass from one person to another.

Source: Linta. ru

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