Sudan Doctors Syndicate calls on the international community to help stop the fighting Sudan Doctors Syndicate calls on the international community to help stop the fighting

Sudan Doctors Syndicate calls on the international community to help stop the fighting

Sudan Doctors Syndicate calls on the international community to help stop the fighting  The Sudan Doctors Syndicate called on the international community for urgent assistance in stopping armed confrontations in the country between the army and the Rapid Support Forces.  On Saturday, the "Sudan Doctors Syndicate" called on the international community to "urgently assist" in stopping armed confrontations in the country between the army and the "Rapid Support Forces."  A statement issued by the Sudanese trade union stated: "We appeal to the international and regional community for urgent help to stop this bloody conflict, and urge countries to refrain from any action that fuels the conflict and increases its ignition and spread in the country."   The statement also appealed to "the international community to put pressure on the two parties to the conflict to open safe passages for the transfer of aid, the wounded and the dead bodies."  He added, "We call for a commitment not to attack health facilities and ambulances, and to monitor the truce that began on Friday, and it suffers from violations like its predecessors, and to know who is violating it."  On Friday evening, the Sudanese army announced in a statement its agreement to a 3-day truce, hours after the Rapid Support Forces announced its agreement to a truce in the fighting that has claimed the lives of 413 people since it broke out on April 15, according to the World Health Organization.  In 2013, the "Quick Support" was formed to support government forces in their fight against the rebel movements in the Darfur region (west), and then assumed tasks, including combating irregular migration and maintaining security, before the army described it as "rebel" after the outbreak of clashes.           Sudan Hamidti affirms his commitment to the armistice, and Al-Burhan promises to hand over power to civilians  Muhammad Hamdan Dagalo, "Hamidti," said in a phone call with French Foreign Minister Catherine Colonna that his forces are committed to a complete ceasefire during the armistice period, while the Sudanese army commander, Abdel Fattah al-Burhan, affirmed the commitment of the armed forces to "hand over power to a civilian government."  The commander of the Rapid Support Forces in Sudan, Muhammad Hamdan Dagalo "Hamedti", announced on Saturday that his forces are committed to a complete ceasefire during the armistice period.  Hamidti said in a tweet: "I discussed today, by phone with French Foreign Minister Catherine Colonna, the current developments in Sudan, the reasons that led to the aggravation of the situation, and how to invest the declared truce in opening humanitarian corridors."  He added, "We are committed to a complete ceasefire during the armistice period, and we affirm our respect for international humanitarian law and the rights of all civilians."  Hamidti expressed his thanks to the French Foreign Minister for "the fruitful and constructive discussion, in which we agreed on many necessary issues that will have a direct impact on the overall situation in the country."  For his part, the commander of the Sudanese army, Abdel Fattah Al-Burhan, announced on Saturday the commitment of the armed forces to "hand over power to a civilian government."  Al-Burhan said in statements broadcasted by Al-Arabiya TV, that "the Rapid Support Forces are taking civilians as human shields," adding that they "attacked prisons, released prisoners, and killed police guards."  He stressed that "the Rapid Support Forces are the ones that started the attack and we took a defensive position," explaining that "the rebels (meaning the Rapid Support Forces) evacuated the homes of their owners and turned them into camps."  The Sudanese army commander pointed out that "the armed forces are committed to handing over power to a civilian government," noting that "the armed forces are a nationalist army that is not infiltrated by Islamists, and there are no remnants (supporters of the former ruling regime) fighting with it."  Al-Burhan stated: "I am currently in the command center (in the center of the capital, Khartoum), and I will not leave him except on the coffin of a martyr to the homeland."  Until 14:20, the Rapid Support Forces did not comment on Al-Burhan's statements regarding them.  And on Saturday, clashes renewed between the Sudanese army and the "rapid support" forces, in the vicinity of the presidential palace in the center of the capital, Khartoum, despite a declared humanitarian truce between the two parties for a period of 3 days on the occasion of Eid al-Fitr.  On Friday evening, the Sudanese army announced, in a statement, its agreement to a 3-day truce, hours after the Rapid Support Forces announced its agreement to a truce in the fighting that has claimed the lives of 413 people since it broke out on April 15, according to the World Health Organization.  In 2013, the "Quick Support" was formed to support government forces in their fight against the rebel movements in the Darfur region (west), and then assumed tasks, including combating irregular migration and maintaining security, before the army described it as "rebel" after the outbreak of clashes.        Sudan The people of Khartoum are trying to escape from the war, as it squanders the joy of Eid  With the start of Eid Al-Fitr, bullets and artillery shells are still reverberating throughout the Sudanese capital, Khartoum, despite international calls and appeals for a ceasefire between the Sudanese army and the Rapid Support Forces to allow the entry of humanitarian relief materials for besieged civilians.  Eid al-Fitr in past years was an occasion when many residents of Khartoum went out to visit family and relatives outside the city, but the situation has changed this year, as those who are able to leave are embarking on a flight of panic, after the Sudanese capital has turned into a city that expels its residents because of the war.  And with the start of Eid al-Fitr on Friday, bullets and artillery shells are still reverberating in the city, despite international appeals for a cease-fire, to allow the entry of relief materials, and to open a safe passage for the besieged civilians.  On Friday, the two parties to the conflict announced that they would abide by a truce, but sporadic shelling continued in Khartoum until the evening.   Over the past week, many have sought to move to safer areas of the capital, despite the army's closure of the bridges on the Nile between Khartoum and its twin cities, Omdurman and Bahri.  Some of them decided to leave and went out dragging their bags along the roads or carrying them over the heads, starting at the beginning of their journey, and often going out to the state of Gezira in the south or to the state of the River Nile in the north.  Ahmed Mubarak, 27, said he was very worried after the violence broke out on April 15, and before he decided to leave Khartoum yesterday, Thursday, with only the clothes he was wearing.  He added that there are no buses and that people travel on foot carrying their bags, and that the cars that pass are all private and full.  Eventually he was able to board one of the buses whose owner had volunteered to ferry people out of Khartoum. Mubarak arrived in Atbara, about 280 km northeast of Khartoum, and knocked on the door of his family's house.  Mubarak stated that they did not believe it and that it was a wonderful moment.  The power struggle between Sudan's army and the paramilitary Rapid Support Forces (RSF) pushed the capital, Khartoum, for the first time into a large-scale war and displacement that Khartoum's population has seen in other parts of the country in decades past.  The clashes that took place in the last days of Ramadan caused the water and electricity supplies to be cut off for long periods, the airport turned into a battlefield and most hospitals closed.  In many neighborhoods of Khartoum State, which has a population of ten million, residents have been confined to their homes and only left to get their necessities from looted stores, which have dwindling supplies.  Risky trips It became difficult to find fuel. As with other commodities, its prices have jumped since the fighting began.  “Khartoum has become dangerous and we fear the war will get worse,” says Mahasin Ahmed, 55, as she leaves the Jabra district in southern Khartoum with two of her relatives, hoping to find a bus to Madani, 165km to the southeast.  Many fleeing are getting their first glimpse of the devastation wrought by the fighting, with buildings battered by missile strikes, power lines cut, walls riddled with bullets and military vehicles charred in the streets.  As violence erupts in other parts of Sudan, some are seeking to leave the country in groups, with up to 20,000 crossing the border into Chad and others heading north towards Egypt.  These journeys are fraught with danger as those fleeing often have to pass through RSF checkpoints where they are usually allowed to pass but at times some civilians come under fire.  Makram Walid, a 25-year-old doctor, had hoped to leave Khartoum with his family but was worried about the danger to his three younger sisters.  "It is very difficult to deal with the danger of leaving our home and leaving our possessions," he said.  Some residents in Khartoum fear RSF members will move into their homes if they leave. The Rapid Support Forces are already deployed in several districts of the capital.  Alia Mutawakel, a 26-year-old architect and interior designer living in Khartoum, was seen trying to find a safe way out of the city with two of her brothers, her uncle and cousins, and her eight-month-old nephew after their efforts to celebrate Eid al-Fitr with their family failed. and their friends inside the ruined city.  "Will we be able to leave the house or not? And if we leave the house, will we be safe? And if we leave, will we be able to return to our home and life in Khartoum? All these questions are in my mind and I have no answer," she asked.

The Sudan Doctors Syndicate called on the international community for urgent assistance in stopping armed confrontations in the country between the army and the Rapid Support Forces.

On Saturday, the "Sudan Doctors Syndicate" called on the international community to "urgently assist" in stopping armed confrontations in the country between the army and the "Rapid Support Forces."

A statement issued by the Sudanese trade union stated: "We appeal to the international and regional community for urgent help to stop this bloody conflict, and urge countries to refrain from any action that fuels the conflict and increases its ignition and spread in the country."


The statement also appealed to "the international community to put pressure on the two parties to the conflict to open safe passages for the transfer of aid, the wounded and the dead bodies."

He added, "We call for a commitment not to attack health facilities and ambulances, and to monitor the truce that began on Friday, and it suffers from violations like its predecessors, and to know who is violating it."

On Friday evening, the Sudanese army announced in a statement its agreement to a 3-day truce, hours after the Rapid Support Forces announced its agreement to a truce in the fighting that has claimed the lives of 413 people since it broke out on April 15, according to the World Health Organization.

In 2013, the "Quick Support" was formed to support government forces in their fight against the rebel movements in the Darfur region (west), and then assumed tasks, including combating irregular migration and maintaining security, before the army described it as "rebel" after the outbreak of clashes.










Sudan Hamidti affirms his commitment to the armistice, and Al-Burhan promises to hand over power to civilians


Muhammad Hamdan Dagalo, "Hamidti," said in a phone call with French Foreign Minister Catherine Colonna that his forces are committed to a complete ceasefire during the armistice period, while the Sudanese army commander, Abdel Fattah al-Burhan, affirmed the commitment of the armed forces to "hand over power to a civilian government."

The commander of the Rapid Support Forces in Sudan, Muhammad Hamdan Dagalo "Hamedti", announced on Saturday that his forces are committed to a complete ceasefire during the armistice period.

Hamidti said in a tweet: "I discussed today, by phone with French Foreign Minister Catherine Colonna, the current developments in Sudan, the reasons that led to the aggravation of the situation, and how to invest the declared truce in opening humanitarian corridors."

He added, "We are committed to a complete ceasefire during the armistice period, and we affirm our respect for international humanitarian law and the rights of all civilians."

Hamidti expressed his thanks to the French Foreign Minister for "the fruitful and constructive discussion, in which we agreed on many necessary issues that will have a direct impact on the overall situation in the country."

For his part, the commander of the Sudanese army, Abdel Fattah Al-Burhan, announced on Saturday the commitment of the armed forces to "hand over power to a civilian government."

Al-Burhan said in statements broadcasted by Al-Arabiya TV, that "the Rapid Support Forces are taking civilians as human shields," adding that they "attacked prisons, released prisoners, and killed police guards."

He stressed that "the Rapid Support Forces are the ones that started the attack and we took a defensive position," explaining that "the rebels (meaning the Rapid Support Forces) evacuated the homes of their owners and turned them into camps."

The Sudanese army commander pointed out that "the armed forces are committed to handing over power to a civilian government," noting that "the armed forces are a nationalist army that is not infiltrated by Islamists, and there are no remnants (supporters of the former ruling regime) fighting with it."

Al-Burhan stated: "I am currently in the command center (in the center of the capital, Khartoum), and I will not leave him except on the coffin of a martyr to the homeland."

Until 14:20, the Rapid Support Forces did not comment on Al-Burhan's statements regarding them.

And on Saturday, clashes renewed between the Sudanese army and the "rapid support" forces, in the vicinity of the presidential palace in the center of the capital, Khartoum, despite a declared humanitarian truce between the two parties for a period of 3 days on the occasion of Eid al-Fitr.

On Friday evening, the Sudanese army announced, in a statement, its agreement to a 3-day truce, hours after the Rapid Support Forces announced its agreement to a truce in the fighting that has claimed the lives of 413 people since it broke out on April 15, according to the World Health Organization.

In 2013, the "Quick Support" was formed to support government forces in their fight against the rebel movements in the Darfur region (west), and then assumed tasks, including combating irregular migration and maintaining security, before the army described it as "rebel" after the outbreak of clashes.







Sudan The people of Khartoum are trying to escape from the war, as it squanders the joy of Eid


With the start of Eid Al-Fitr, bullets and artillery shells are still reverberating throughout the Sudanese capital, Khartoum, despite international calls and appeals for a ceasefire between the Sudanese army and the Rapid Support Forces to allow the entry of humanitarian relief materials for besieged civilians.

Eid al-Fitr in past years was an occasion when many residents of Khartoum went out to visit family and relatives outside the city, but the situation has changed this year, as those who are able to leave are embarking on a flight of panic, after the Sudanese capital has turned into a city that expels its residents because of the war.

And with the start of Eid al-Fitr on Friday, bullets and artillery shells are still reverberating in the city, despite international appeals for a cease-fire, to allow the entry of relief materials, and to open a safe passage for the besieged civilians.

On Friday, the two parties to the conflict announced that they would abide by a truce, but sporadic shelling continued in Khartoum until the evening.


Over the past week, many have sought to move to safer areas of the capital, despite the army's closure of the bridges on the Nile between Khartoum and its twin cities, Omdurman and Bahri.

Some of them decided to leave and went out dragging their bags along the roads or carrying them over the heads, starting at the beginning of their journey, and often going out to the state of Gezira in the south or to the state of the River Nile in the north.

Ahmed Mubarak, 27, said he was very worried after the violence broke out on April 15, and before he decided to leave Khartoum yesterday, Thursday, with only the clothes he was wearing.

He added that there are no buses and that people travel on foot carrying their bags, and that the cars that pass are all private and full.

Eventually he was able to board one of the buses whose owner had volunteered to ferry people out of Khartoum. Mubarak arrived in Atbara, about 280 km northeast of Khartoum, and knocked on the door of his family's house.

Mubarak stated that they did not believe it and that it was a wonderful moment.

The power struggle between Sudan's army and the paramilitary Rapid Support Forces (RSF) pushed the capital, Khartoum, for the first time into a large-scale war and displacement that Khartoum's population has seen in other parts of the country in decades past.

The clashes that took place in the last days of Ramadan caused the water and electricity supplies to be cut off for long periods, the airport turned into a battlefield and most hospitals closed.

In many neighborhoods of Khartoum State, which has a population of ten million, residents have been confined to their homes and only left to get their necessities from looted stores, which have dwindling supplies.

Risky trips
It became difficult to find fuel. As with other commodities, its prices have jumped since the fighting began.

“Khartoum has become dangerous and we fear the war will get worse,” says Mahasin Ahmed, 55, as she leaves the Jabra district in southern Khartoum with two of her relatives, hoping to find a bus to Madani, 165km to the southeast.

Many fleeing are getting their first glimpse of the devastation wrought by the fighting, with buildings battered by missile strikes, power lines cut, walls riddled with bullets and military vehicles charred in the streets.

As violence erupts in other parts of Sudan, some are seeking to leave the country in groups, with up to 20,000 crossing the border into Chad and others heading north towards Egypt.

These journeys are fraught with danger as those fleeing often have to pass through RSF checkpoints where they are usually allowed to pass but at times some civilians come under fire.

Makram Walid, a 25-year-old doctor, had hoped to leave Khartoum with his family but was worried about the danger to his three younger sisters.

"It is very difficult to deal with the danger of leaving our home and leaving our possessions," he said.

Some residents in Khartoum fear RSF members will move into their homes if they leave. The Rapid Support Forces are already deployed in several districts of the capital.

Alia Mutawakel, a 26-year-old architect and interior designer living in Khartoum, was seen trying to find a safe way out of the city with two of her brothers, her uncle and cousins, and her eight-month-old nephew after their efforts to celebrate Eid al-Fitr with their family failed. and their friends inside the ruined city.

"Will we be able to leave the house or not? And if we leave the house, will we be safe? And if we leave, will we be able to return to our home and life in Khartoum? All these questions are in my mind and I have no answer," she asked.




Dead and wounded in a triple suicide attack on a "Russian camp" in central Mali


Attackers attacked an army camp in central Mali, local officials said, describing the site as a "Russian camp", while the attack killed at least nine civilians and injured more than 60 others.

At least nine civilians were killed and more than 60 wounded in a triple suicide attack in the town of Sevare in central Mali early Saturday morning, a local official said.

"The explosion destroyed 20 houses in the neighborhood. In all, there are nine dead and about 60 injured, all civilians," said Jacoba Maiga, spokesman for the district governor.

Earlier on Saturday, Mali's government said in a statement broadcast on state television that the army had thwarted a "terrorist attack" in Sevare.

"Three rigged vehicles were destroyed by fire from an army drone," the statement said, while photos posted by users on social media showed several destroyed buildings, including a gas station, as well as injured people receiving assistance.

According to eyewitnesses, four explosions sounded around 5:30 am local time, followed by firing from automatic weapons, while smoke was seen near the airport.

Another local official said, "The Russian camp and its planes were targeted (the camp is close to the airport). The jihadists surrounded part of the airport."

The Minusma camp covers four hectares and is close to the airport and the Malian army camp where the Russians are.

The ruling generals in Bamako since the 2020 coup severed the alliance with France and its European partners in the fight against jihadists, and decided to open up to Russia militarily and politically.

The military council decided to cooperate with hundreds of elements it says are Russian military trainers, while Western powers say they are mercenaries from the Russian paramilitary Wagner Group.

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