The Sudanese demand a democratic transition The Sudanese demand a democratic transition

The Sudanese demand a democratic transition

The Sudanese demand a democratic transition  In Khartoum, a day of mobilization brought together hundreds of demonstrators to mark the anniversary of two revolts, which had overthrown two putschist presidents. This call to demonstrate was launched on Wednesday by the historic civil bloc of the Forces of Freedom and Change (FLC).  Since the putsch of October 2021, Sudan has been at an impasse, after another postponement of the signing of the crisis resolution agreement between civilians, soldiers and paramilitaries, supposed to relaunch the democratic transition.  Sudan has been in turmoil since a coup led by the country's top general, Abdel Fattah Burhan, toppled a Western-backed government in 2021, after three decades of Islamist rule       In South Sudan, water hyacinths turned into fuel  Considered a weed in most parts of the world, water hyacinth is a boon to residents of Bentiu town, South Sudan, who have managed to profit from its proliferation by transforming it, with very little effort, in ecological and accessible fuel.  In South Sudan , the city of Bentiu has been devastated by floods linked to the climate crisis for 4 years . For the women of this town in northern East Africa, water hyacinths  , a weed that is abundant and rich in biomass, is a new source of sustainable and accessible fuel.  "The many floods have destroyed the forest which was the source of the charcoal we used to use, now water hyacinth charcoal is a much better option," said flood victim Roda Nyawuy in Bentiu.  “Collecting and preparing water hyacinth charcoal is easier than collecting charcoal. Charcoal is very far from here. It takes a boat, which is very expensive  . The water is very close to the dyke and its transformation into fuel is simple, no need for a boat. The women use rakes to collect it, put them in bags and then let them dry for a few days," explains Simon Riak, chief of project.  As the climate crisis reshapes the city's landscape, the World Food Program (WFP) helps turn these women's crops into fuel .  Once collected, the bags of water hyacinth  are placed in a sealed metal drum and then burned on the fire for about twenty minutes before being mixed with sand and water to form blocks of combustible paste.  "The World Food Program has a project in place where we are using this weed to make a type of cooking fuel to reduce charcoal consumption. This type of project is absolutely essential for the future because it will help families to live in better conditions despite the floods,” informs, Gemma Snowdon, director of communication of the WFP in South Sudan.  The price of charcoal having doubled in one year in the city, the water hyacinth is a godsend for this population already experienced by difficulties in obtaining basic necessities .  Around 300 people , mostly women, are involved in producing the water hyacinth charcoal trays and encouraging their adoption within the community.  Tea vendors and some restaurateurs have been invited to test the effectiveness of these combustible pastes.  According to experts, the floods around Bentiu could take years or even decades to subside .


In Khartoum, a day of mobilization brought together hundreds of demonstrators to mark the anniversary of two revolts, which had overthrown two putschist presidents. This call to demonstrate was launched on Wednesday by the historic civil bloc of the Forces of Freedom and Change (FLC).

Since the putsch of October 2021, Sudan has been at an impasse, after another postponement of the signing of the crisis resolution agreement between civilians, soldiers and paramilitaries, supposed to relaunch the democratic transition.

Sudan has been in turmoil since a coup led by the country's top general, Abdel Fattah Burhan, toppled a Western-backed government in 2021, after three decades of Islamist rule


In South Sudan, water hyacinths turned into fuel


Considered a weed in most parts of the world, water hyacinth is a boon to residents of Bentiu town, South Sudan, who have managed to profit from its proliferation by transforming it, with very little effort, in ecological and accessible fuel.

In South Sudan , the city of Bentiu has been devastated by floods linked to the climate crisis for 4 years . For the women of this town in northern East Africa, water hyacinths  , a weed that is abundant and rich in biomass, is a new source of sustainable and accessible fuel.

"The many floods have destroyed the forest which was the source of the charcoal we used to use, now water hyacinth charcoal is a much better option," said flood victim Roda Nyawuy in Bentiu.

“Collecting and preparing water hyacinth charcoal is easier than collecting charcoal. Charcoal is very far from here. It takes a boat, which is very expensive  . The water is very close to the dyke and its transformation into fuel is simple, no need for a boat. The women use rakes to collect it, put them in bags and then let them dry for a few days," explains Simon Riak, chief of project.

As the climate crisis reshapes the city's landscape, the World Food Program (WFP) helps turn these women's crops into fuel .

Once collected, the bags of water hyacinth  are placed in a sealed metal drum and then burned on the fire for about twenty minutes before being mixed with sand and water to form blocks of combustible paste.

"The World Food Program has a project in place where we are using this weed to make a type of cooking fuel to reduce charcoal consumption. This type of project is absolutely essential for the future because it will help families to live in better conditions despite the floods,” informs, Gemma Snowdon, director of communication of the WFP in South Sudan.

The price of charcoal having doubled in one year in the city, the water hyacinth is a godsend for this population already experienced by difficulties in obtaining basic necessities .

Around 300 people , mostly women, are involved in producing the water hyacinth charcoal trays and encouraging their adoption within the community.

Tea vendors and some restaurateurs have been invited to test the effectiveness of these combustible pastes.

According to experts, the floods around Bentiu could take years or even decades to subside .

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