Al-Burhan: There is no point in political dialogue without achieving a cease-fire Al-Burhan: There is no point in political dialogue without achieving a cease-fire

Al-Burhan: There is no point in political dialogue without achieving a cease-fire

Al-Burhan: There is no point in political dialogue without achieving a cease-fire The Commander-in-Chief of the Sudanese Army, Abdel Fattah Al-Burhan, said during a telephone interview with the Egyptian news channel, Al-Qahira, that "there is no benefit from political dialogue without achieving a ceasefire," pointing out that "a peaceful solution is the best way to resolve the political crisis in the country."  The Commander-in-Chief of the Sudanese Army, Abdel Fattah Al-Burhan, said on Monday that "there is no benefit in political dialogue without achieving a ceasefire."  In a telephone interview with the Egyptian news channel, Al-Qahira, Al-Burhan said, "The rebels occupied service facilities, entered residential neighborhoods, and disrupted people's lives."  On Sunday evening, Saudi Arabia announced the continuation of the talks, which it is hosting in Jeddah, between representatives of the Sudanese army and the "rapid support" forces, for days to reach an "effective cease-fire."  Al-Burhan added in his intervention, "There is no benefit in negotiations with the Rapid Support Forces if they do not leave the residential neighborhoods and evacuate the capital from the military presence."  He pointed out that the Rapid Support Forces do not exist in any military site, but rather their presence is limited to residential neighborhoods and service facilities.  And he added, "Severe damage has befallen Sudanese families, especially in Khartoum, as a result of the current battles due to the actions of the rebels."  Al-Burhan pointed to "the stability of the situation in all parts of the country, except for Khartoum, which is witnessing military operations, and he pointed to fears of the spread of fighting to other states."  He reported that the army is close to ending the presence of the Rapid Support Forces in the capital, Khartoum.  He stressed that "a peaceful solution is the best way to solve the political crisis in the country."  Negotiations faltered in Saudi Arabia  On the other hand, a Saudi diplomat told the French Press Agency that the ceasefire negotiations did not make "much progress", which dampens hopes of reaching a quick end to the fighting.  "The negotiations have not made much progress so far," the Saudi official said. He added, "A permanent ceasefire is not on the table. Each side believes that it is able to resolve the battle."  Saudi Arabia played a central role in the evacuations from Sudan, and sent warships and commercial ships to transport thousands of civilians from Port Sudan across the Red Sea to Jeddah.  On Wednesday, the army announced its approval of the IGAD initiative to extend the truce for a week, while the Rapid Support Forces announced on Friday its acceptance of extending the humanitarian truce for 72 hours, in response to US-Saudi mediation, while a new truce has not yet been announced between the two warring parties.  Since mid-April, states in Sudan, including Khartoum (center), have witnessed large-scale clashes between the army, led by Abdel Fattah al-Burhan, and the Rapid Support Forces, led by Muhammad Hamdan Dagalo, "Hamidti", which left dead, wounded, and difficult humanitarian conditions.  The Sudan Doctors Syndicate estimated the number of civilian casualties in the clashes at 481 dead, and more than 2,564 injured, according to the latest statistics.       Sect in Kenya: autopsies do not conclude that organs were harvested  Autopsies carried out on 112 bodies of cult members unearthed from shallow graves in coastal Kilifi County, Kenya, ruled out the possibility of organ harvesting.  According to government pathologists , some of the victims died of starvation , strangulation and suffocation.  The cult's leader , Pastor Paul Mackenzie, is said to have encouraged members to fast to death in order to reach paradise.  Kenyan police are expected to dig more graves in search of other victims. Mackenzie is currently in police custody pending an investigation.  The Kenya Red Cross has reported 360 people missing, while at least 60 others have been rescued alive.  President William Ruto has set up a commission of inquiry to investigate the deaths of these followers of a Christian sect.

The Commander-in-Chief of the Sudanese Army, Abdel Fattah Al-Burhan, said during a telephone interview with the Egyptian news channel, Al-Qahira, that "there is no benefit from political dialogue without achieving a ceasefire," pointing out that "a peaceful solution is the best way to resolve the political crisis in the country."

The Commander-in-Chief of the Sudanese Army, Abdel Fattah Al-Burhan, said on Monday that "there is no benefit in political dialogue without achieving a ceasefire."

In a telephone interview with the Egyptian news channel, Al-Qahira, Al-Burhan said, "The rebels occupied service facilities, entered residential neighborhoods, and disrupted people's lives."

On Sunday evening, Saudi Arabia announced the continuation of the talks, which it is hosting in Jeddah, between representatives of the Sudanese army and the "rapid support" forces, for days to reach an "effective cease-fire."

Al-Burhan added in his intervention, "There is no benefit in negotiations with the Rapid Support Forces if they do not leave the residential neighborhoods and evacuate the capital from the military presence."

He pointed out that the Rapid Support Forces do not exist in any military site, but rather their presence is limited to residential neighborhoods and service facilities.

And he added, "Severe damage has befallen Sudanese families, especially in Khartoum, as a result of the current battles due to the actions of the rebels."

Al-Burhan pointed to "the stability of the situation in all parts of the country, except for Khartoum, which is witnessing military operations, and he pointed to fears of the spread of fighting to other states."

He reported that the army is close to ending the presence of the Rapid Support Forces in the capital, Khartoum.

He stressed that "a peaceful solution is the best way to solve the political crisis in the country."

Negotiations faltered in Saudi Arabia

On the other hand, a Saudi diplomat told the French Press Agency that the ceasefire negotiations did not make "much progress", which dampens hopes of reaching a quick end to the fighting.

"The negotiations have not made much progress so far," the Saudi official said. He added, "A permanent ceasefire is not on the table. Each side believes that it is able to resolve the battle."

Saudi Arabia played a central role in the evacuations from Sudan, and sent warships and commercial ships to transport thousands of civilians from Port Sudan across the Red Sea to Jeddah.

On Wednesday, the army announced its approval of the IGAD initiative to extend the truce for a week, while the Rapid Support Forces announced on Friday its acceptance of extending the humanitarian truce for 72 hours, in response to US-Saudi mediation, while a new truce has not yet been announced between the two warring parties.

Since mid-April, states in Sudan, including Khartoum (center), have witnessed large-scale clashes between the army, led by Abdel Fattah al-Burhan, and the Rapid Support Forces, led by Muhammad Hamdan Dagalo, "Hamidti", which left dead, wounded, and difficult humanitarian conditions.

The Sudan Doctors Syndicate estimated the number of civilian casualties in the clashes at 481 dead, and more than 2,564 injured, according to the latest statistics.






Al-Burhan: There is no point in political dialogue without achieving a cease-fire The Commander-in-Chief of the Sudanese Army, Abdel Fattah Al-Burhan, said during a telephone interview with the Egyptian news channel, Al-Qahira, that "there is no benefit from political dialogue without achieving a ceasefire," pointing out that "a peaceful solution is the best way to resolve the political crisis in the country."  The Commander-in-Chief of the Sudanese Army, Abdel Fattah Al-Burhan, said on Monday that "there is no benefit in political dialogue without achieving a ceasefire."  In a telephone interview with the Egyptian news channel, Al-Qahira, Al-Burhan said, "The rebels occupied service facilities, entered residential neighborhoods, and disrupted people's lives."  On Sunday evening, Saudi Arabia announced the continuation of the talks, which it is hosting in Jeddah, between representatives of the Sudanese army and the "rapid support" forces, for days to reach an "effective cease-fire."  Al-Burhan added in his intervention, "There is no benefit in negotiations with the Rapid Support Forces if they do not leave the residential neighborhoods and evacuate the capital from the military presence."  He pointed out that the Rapid Support Forces do not exist in any military site, but rather their presence is limited to residential neighborhoods and service facilities.  And he added, "Severe damage has befallen Sudanese families, especially in Khartoum, as a result of the current battles due to the actions of the rebels."  Al-Burhan pointed to "the stability of the situation in all parts of the country, except for Khartoum, which is witnessing military operations, and he pointed to fears of the spread of fighting to other states."  He reported that the army is close to ending the presence of the Rapid Support Forces in the capital, Khartoum.  He stressed that "a peaceful solution is the best way to solve the political crisis in the country."  Negotiations faltered in Saudi Arabia  On the other hand, a Saudi diplomat told the French Press Agency that the ceasefire negotiations did not make "much progress", which dampens hopes of reaching a quick end to the fighting.  "The negotiations have not made much progress so far," the Saudi official said. He added, "A permanent ceasefire is not on the table. Each side believes that it is able to resolve the battle."  Saudi Arabia played a central role in the evacuations from Sudan, and sent warships and commercial ships to transport thousands of civilians from Port Sudan across the Red Sea to Jeddah.  On Wednesday, the army announced its approval of the IGAD initiative to extend the truce for a week, while the Rapid Support Forces announced on Friday its acceptance of extending the humanitarian truce for 72 hours, in response to US-Saudi mediation, while a new truce has not yet been announced between the two warring parties.  Since mid-April, states in Sudan, including Khartoum (center), have witnessed large-scale clashes between the army, led by Abdel Fattah al-Burhan, and the Rapid Support Forces, led by Muhammad Hamdan Dagalo, "Hamidti", which left dead, wounded, and difficult humanitarian conditions.  The Sudan Doctors Syndicate estimated the number of civilian casualties in the clashes at 481 dead, and more than 2,564 injured, according to the latest statistics.       Sect in Kenya: autopsies do not conclude that organs were harvested  Autopsies carried out on 112 bodies of cult members unearthed from shallow graves in coastal Kilifi County, Kenya, ruled out the possibility of organ harvesting.  According to government pathologists , some of the victims died of starvation , strangulation and suffocation.  The cult's leader , Pastor Paul Mackenzie, is said to have encouraged members to fast to death in order to reach paradise.  Kenyan police are expected to dig more graves in search of other victims. Mackenzie is currently in police custody pending an investigation.  The Kenya Red Cross has reported 360 people missing, while at least 60 others have been rescued alive.  President William Ruto has set up a commission of inquiry to investigate the deaths of these followers of a Christian sect.

Sect in Kenya: autopsies do not conclude that organs were harvested

Autopsies carried out on 112 bodies of cult members unearthed from shallow graves in coastal Kilifi County, Kenya, ruled out the possibility of organ harvesting.

According to government pathologists , some of the victims died of starvation , strangulation and suffocation.

The cult's leader , Pastor Paul Mackenzie, is said to have encouraged members to fast to death in order to reach paradise.

Kenyan police are expected to dig more graves in search of other victims. Mackenzie is currently in police custody pending an investigation.

The Kenya Red Cross has reported 360 people missing, while at least 60 others have been rescued alive.

President William Ruto has set up a commission of inquiry to investigate the deaths of these followers of a Christian sect.


733 years in prison An Egyptian website publishes details of the arrest of the owner of a chain of pharmacies, a fugitive from justice


After pursuits that lasted for several months, a secret security mission succeeded in arresting the owner of the "Dawaee" pharmacy chain, Essam Abdel Fattah Munazia, after identifying his secret hideout in the Fifth Settlement in Cairo.
The case began years ago when the rights holders chased the owner of the famous pharmacy chain, and demanded payment of debts owed by him, but he failed to pay and began evading prosecution.

The Egyptian "Veto" portal stated that the Department of Execution of Sentences in the Public Security Sector and the Security Directorates of Cairo and Giza pursued the doctor to determine his hiding place, as he kept moving from one place to another until he was arrested and presented to the Public Prosecution.

The Egyptian website reported that the accused submitted objections to some of the sentences issued against him.

The portal indicated that the "Dawae" pharmacies chain has branches in some governorates and is widely spread in October, Sheikh Zayed, Mohandessin, Cairo, Alexandria, Giza and other branches.

And in 2021, Dr. Essam Abdel-Fattah Munazi, owner of the “Dawaee” pharmacies chain, was arrested to implement more than 100 judgments issued against him, for issuing checks without balance in favor of a company for more than 50 million pounds, and a decision was issued by the Public Prosecutor to prevent him from traveling.

The agencies of the Ministry of the Interior have intensified their search efforts to control convicts and fugitives from the implementation of judicial rulings, as they are wanted in 820 sentences, with a total of 733 years of imprisonment and guarantees amounting to more than 2 million pounds.

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