Identify three waves of migration of the ancients to Europe Identify three waves of migration of the ancients to Europe

Identify three waves of migration of the ancients to Europe

Identify three waves of migration of the ancients to Europe  Scientists from the University of Toulouse and the French National Center for Scientific Studies announce that modern humans migrated to Europe in three waves during the Paleolithic period.  PLOS ONE magazine indicates that the researchers analyzed data on stone tools in western Eurasia to track changes in the activity of ancient humans in the region. The researchers focused their attention on two archaeological sites - Qasr Aqil in Lebanon and Grote Mandrine Cave in France, where traces of the oldest migration of Homo sapiens to Europe 54,000 years ago were discovered.  Researchers have discovered three distinct waves of early migration of modern humans into Europe from the eastern coast of the Mediterranean. It was previously believed that Homo sapiens arrived in Europe between 42 and 45 thousand years BC. In fact, it was the last of the three major waves of immigration to Europe.  According to the researchers, the first stage - dating from about the fifty-fourth millennium, is represented by the Neronian civilization (named after the Grotte de Néron cave) at the beginning of the Upper Paleolithic period. As for the second stage, it dates back to the Chatelperron civilization, at the beginning of the Upper Paleolithic period, around the forty-fifth millennium, and the third stage is the Proto-Aurignacian civilization, around the forty-second millennium BC.          A Chinese spacecraft returns to Earth after 276 days  Chinese media reported that an experimental Chinese spacecraft returned to Earth on Monday after 276 days in orbit, completing a historic mission to test reusable technologies in space. The media said the unmanned spacecraft returned as scheduled to the Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center in northwest China.  No details were provided about what the spacecraft was, the technologies tested, and how high it had flown since its launch in early August 2022, and no photos of the vehicle have been released to the public.  State media said the tests by the spacecraft marked an "important" breakthrough in China's research into reusable spacecraft technology, which will provide a convenient and inexpensive method for future space missions.  The spacecraft landed on Earth "horizontally," according to the China Aerospace Science and Technology Corporation, the prime contractor for China's space program.  In 2021, what may be a similar spacecraft blasted off to the edge of space and returned to Earth the same day on a mission that was also largely classified.  Commentators on Chinese social media have speculated that Beijing is developing a spacecraft like the US Air Force's X-37B, an unmanned space plane that can remain in orbit for years.  The uncrewed, reusable X-37B returned to Earth in November last year on its sixth and final mission after more than 900 days in orbit.          SpaceX launches 56 new generation satellites  On Thursday, May 4, the American private company "SpaceX" launched a "Falcon 9" rocket with 56 new-generation small satellites. And the company's page on "Twitter" (the social network banned in Russia) stated that the successful launch of a new group of satellites of the "Starlink" network had been confirmed.  The rocket was launched at 03:31 on May 4 local time from the Cape Canaveral spaceport. The first stage of the rocket landed 8.5 minutes after it was launched from a floating platform in the Pacific Ocean.  It is noteworthy that the "Starlink" network is dedicated to ensuring Internet access thanks to the deployment of a large number of satellites weighing 260 kg. 11,000 satellites of this type will be launched, which will cost the company $10 billion.  According to the "Starlink" company, the updated satellite network is able to guarantee Internet access with a speed of 1 gigabit per second, which is suitable for the 5G standard.  The company has already launched 3,800 Starlink satellites into Earth's orbit.          Hubble traces the site of a violent stellar death in a distant Milky Way-like galaxy  The Hubble Space Telescope has captured the clearest image yet of a distant galaxy as it searches for evidence of a supernova. The region, which was imaged by the space telescope, came under the spotlight three years ago after astronomers witnessed the violent death of one of its massive stars just days after it ran out of fuel and exploded in a supernova.   The new image shows the distant galaxy UGC 678, located 260 million light-years from Earth in the constellation of Pisces.  While astronomers know very little about the galaxy's formation and composition, previous observations using various telescopes revealed it to be an interesting object.   On December 2, 2020, astronomers discovered evidence of a "massive supernova explosion" near the galactic core, revealing that a star larger than the sun had run out of fuel and collapsed under its own gravity.  The mysterious star's explosive death that followed was captured by the Terrestrial Asteroid Impact Alert System (ATLAS), a network of four telescopes in Hawaii, Chile and South Africa that scours the skies for nearby Terrestrial asteroids.  Although ATLAS' main focus is warning astronomers of objects that will impact Earth, the project also notes sudden changes in signals from celestial bodies, such as that seen from the violent death of a star in UGC 678.  The astronomers who reported the discovery of this supernova in 2020 said they saw the event "within a few days of the explosion," and called for more detailed observations.  Just two weeks after the discovery, the European Space Agency's (ESA) Gaia spacecraft confirmed that the bright light the astronomers saw was indeed from a supernova.  Additional studies of UGC 678 include observations by the Panoramic Survey Telescope and Rapid Response System, or Pan-STARRS, in Hawaii.  Hubble also observed the galaxy twice to search for debris left in the aftermath of the explosion. "In the hope of discovering clues to the identity of the star that produced supernova 2020," ESA representatives wrote in the description of the image published on April 17.  These multiple discoveries have helped astronomers determine the galaxy's shape, but they don't know much about the exploding star itself.  Although UGC 678 is not part of the Milky Way, the shape of the galaxy appears similar to our own. UGC 678 has a spiral structure with a starry disk that turns into rotating arms.  The galactic center also has a vertical structure, thanks to which gas and dust are funneled inwards. Astronomers say this structure is similar to the center of the Milky Way, but much weaker.

Scientists from the University of Toulouse and the French National Center for Scientific Studies announce that modern humans migrated to Europe in three waves during the Paleolithic period.

PLOS ONE magazine indicates that the researchers analyzed data on stone tools in western Eurasia to track changes in the activity of ancient humans in the region. The researchers focused their attention on two archaeological sites - Qasr Aqil in Lebanon and Grote Mandrine Cave in France, where traces of the oldest migration of Homo sapiens to Europe 54,000 years ago were discovered.

Researchers have discovered three distinct waves of early migration of modern humans into Europe from the eastern coast of the Mediterranean. It was previously believed that Homo sapiens arrived in Europe between 42 and 45 thousand years BC. In fact, it was the last of the three major waves of immigration to Europe.

According to the researchers, the first stage - dating from about the fifty-fourth millennium, is represented by the Neronian civilization (named after the Grotte de Néron cave) at the beginning of the Upper Paleolithic period. As for the second stage, it dates back to the Chatelperron civilization, at the beginning of the Upper Paleolithic period, around the forty-fifth millennium, and the third stage is the Proto-Aurignacian civilization, around the forty-second millennium BC.



A Chinese spacecraft returns to Earth after 276 days

Chinese media reported that an experimental Chinese spacecraft returned to Earth on Monday after 276 days in orbit, completing a historic mission to test reusable technologies in space.
The media said the unmanned spacecraft returned as scheduled to the Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center in northwest China.

No details were provided about what the spacecraft was, the technologies tested, and how high it had flown since its launch in early August 2022, and no photos of the vehicle have been released to the public.

State media said the tests by the spacecraft marked an "important" breakthrough in China's research into reusable spacecraft technology, which will provide a convenient and inexpensive method for future space missions.

The spacecraft landed on Earth "horizontally," according to the China Aerospace Science and Technology Corporation, the prime contractor for China's space program.

In 2021, what may be a similar spacecraft blasted off to the edge of space and returned to Earth the same day on a mission that was also largely classified.

Commentators on Chinese social media have speculated that Beijing is developing a spacecraft like the US Air Force's X-37B, an unmanned space plane that can remain in orbit for years.

The uncrewed, reusable X-37B returned to Earth in November last year on its sixth and final mission after more than 900 days in orbit.




Identify three waves of migration of the ancients to Europe  Scientists from the University of Toulouse and the French National Center for Scientific Studies announce that modern humans migrated to Europe in three waves during the Paleolithic period.  PLOS ONE magazine indicates that the researchers analyzed data on stone tools in western Eurasia to track changes in the activity of ancient humans in the region. The researchers focused their attention on two archaeological sites - Qasr Aqil in Lebanon and Grote Mandrine Cave in France, where traces of the oldest migration of Homo sapiens to Europe 54,000 years ago were discovered.  Researchers have discovered three distinct waves of early migration of modern humans into Europe from the eastern coast of the Mediterranean. It was previously believed that Homo sapiens arrived in Europe between 42 and 45 thousand years BC. In fact, it was the last of the three major waves of immigration to Europe.  According to the researchers, the first stage - dating from about the fifty-fourth millennium, is represented by the Neronian civilization (named after the Grotte de Néron cave) at the beginning of the Upper Paleolithic period. As for the second stage, it dates back to the Chatelperron civilization, at the beginning of the Upper Paleolithic period, around the forty-fifth millennium, and the third stage is the Proto-Aurignacian civilization, around the forty-second millennium BC.          A Chinese spacecraft returns to Earth after 276 days  Chinese media reported that an experimental Chinese spacecraft returned to Earth on Monday after 276 days in orbit, completing a historic mission to test reusable technologies in space. The media said the unmanned spacecraft returned as scheduled to the Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center in northwest China.  No details were provided about what the spacecraft was, the technologies tested, and how high it had flown since its launch in early August 2022, and no photos of the vehicle have been released to the public.  State media said the tests by the spacecraft marked an "important" breakthrough in China's research into reusable spacecraft technology, which will provide a convenient and inexpensive method for future space missions.  The spacecraft landed on Earth "horizontally," according to the China Aerospace Science and Technology Corporation, the prime contractor for China's space program.  In 2021, what may be a similar spacecraft blasted off to the edge of space and returned to Earth the same day on a mission that was also largely classified.  Commentators on Chinese social media have speculated that Beijing is developing a spacecraft like the US Air Force's X-37B, an unmanned space plane that can remain in orbit for years.  The uncrewed, reusable X-37B returned to Earth in November last year on its sixth and final mission after more than 900 days in orbit.          SpaceX launches 56 new generation satellites  On Thursday, May 4, the American private company "SpaceX" launched a "Falcon 9" rocket with 56 new-generation small satellites. And the company's page on "Twitter" (the social network banned in Russia) stated that the successful launch of a new group of satellites of the "Starlink" network had been confirmed.  The rocket was launched at 03:31 on May 4 local time from the Cape Canaveral spaceport. The first stage of the rocket landed 8.5 minutes after it was launched from a floating platform in the Pacific Ocean.  It is noteworthy that the "Starlink" network is dedicated to ensuring Internet access thanks to the deployment of a large number of satellites weighing 260 kg. 11,000 satellites of this type will be launched, which will cost the company $10 billion.  According to the "Starlink" company, the updated satellite network is able to guarantee Internet access with a speed of 1 gigabit per second, which is suitable for the 5G standard.  The company has already launched 3,800 Starlink satellites into Earth's orbit.          Hubble traces the site of a violent stellar death in a distant Milky Way-like galaxy  The Hubble Space Telescope has captured the clearest image yet of a distant galaxy as it searches for evidence of a supernova. The region, which was imaged by the space telescope, came under the spotlight three years ago after astronomers witnessed the violent death of one of its massive stars just days after it ran out of fuel and exploded in a supernova.   The new image shows the distant galaxy UGC 678, located 260 million light-years from Earth in the constellation of Pisces.  While astronomers know very little about the galaxy's formation and composition, previous observations using various telescopes revealed it to be an interesting object.   On December 2, 2020, astronomers discovered evidence of a "massive supernova explosion" near the galactic core, revealing that a star larger than the sun had run out of fuel and collapsed under its own gravity.  The mysterious star's explosive death that followed was captured by the Terrestrial Asteroid Impact Alert System (ATLAS), a network of four telescopes in Hawaii, Chile and South Africa that scours the skies for nearby Terrestrial asteroids.  Although ATLAS' main focus is warning astronomers of objects that will impact Earth, the project also notes sudden changes in signals from celestial bodies, such as that seen from the violent death of a star in UGC 678.  The astronomers who reported the discovery of this supernova in 2020 said they saw the event "within a few days of the explosion," and called for more detailed observations.  Just two weeks after the discovery, the European Space Agency's (ESA) Gaia spacecraft confirmed that the bright light the astronomers saw was indeed from a supernova.  Additional studies of UGC 678 include observations by the Panoramic Survey Telescope and Rapid Response System, or Pan-STARRS, in Hawaii.  Hubble also observed the galaxy twice to search for debris left in the aftermath of the explosion. "In the hope of discovering clues to the identity of the star that produced supernova 2020," ESA representatives wrote in the description of the image published on April 17.  These multiple discoveries have helped astronomers determine the galaxy's shape, but they don't know much about the exploding star itself.  Although UGC 678 is not part of the Milky Way, the shape of the galaxy appears similar to our own. UGC 678 has a spiral structure with a starry disk that turns into rotating arms.  The galactic center also has a vertical structure, thanks to which gas and dust are funneled inwards. Astronomers say this structure is similar to the center of the Milky Way, but much weaker.

SpaceX launches 56 new generation satellites

On Thursday, May 4, the American private company "SpaceX" launched a "Falcon 9" rocket with 56 new-generation small satellites.
And the company's page on "Twitter" (the social network banned in Russia) stated that the successful launch of a new group of satellites of the "Starlink" network had been confirmed.

The rocket was launched at 03:31 on May 4 local time from the Cape Canaveral spaceport. The first stage of the rocket landed 8.5 minutes after it was launched from a floating platform in the Pacific Ocean.

It is noteworthy that the "Starlink" network is dedicated to ensuring Internet access thanks to the deployment of a large number of satellites weighing 260 kg. 11,000 satellites of this type will be launched, which will cost the company $10 billion.

According to the "Starlink" company, the updated satellite network is able to guarantee Internet access with a speed of 1 gigabit per second, which is suitable for the 5G standard.

The company has already launched 3,800 Starlink satellites into Earth's orbit.




Hubble traces the site of a violent stellar death in a distant Milky Way-like galaxy

The Hubble Space Telescope has captured the clearest image yet of a distant galaxy as it searches for evidence of a supernova.
The region, which was imaged by the space telescope, came under the spotlight three years ago after astronomers witnessed the violent death of one of its massive stars just days after it ran out of fuel and exploded in a supernova.


The new image shows the distant galaxy UGC 678, located 260 million light-years from Earth in the constellation of Pisces.

While astronomers know very little about the galaxy's formation and composition, previous observations using various telescopes revealed it to be an interesting object.


On December 2, 2020, astronomers discovered evidence of a "massive supernova explosion" near the galactic core, revealing that a star larger than the sun had run out of fuel and collapsed under its own gravity.

The mysterious star's explosive death that followed was captured by the Terrestrial Asteroid Impact Alert System (ATLAS), a network of four telescopes in Hawaii, Chile and South Africa that scours the skies for nearby Terrestrial asteroids.

Although ATLAS' main focus is warning astronomers of objects that will impact Earth, the project also notes sudden changes in signals from celestial bodies, such as that seen from the violent death of a star in UGC 678.

The astronomers who reported the discovery of this supernova in 2020 said they saw the event "within a few days of the explosion," and called for more detailed observations.

Just two weeks after the discovery, the European Space Agency's (ESA) Gaia spacecraft confirmed that the bright light the astronomers saw was indeed from a supernova.

Additional studies of UGC 678 include observations by the Panoramic Survey Telescope and Rapid Response System, or Pan-STARRS, in Hawaii.

Hubble also observed the galaxy twice to search for debris left in the aftermath of the explosion. "In the hope of discovering clues to the identity of the star that produced supernova 2020," ESA representatives wrote in the description of the image published on April 17.

These multiple discoveries have helped astronomers determine the galaxy's shape, but they don't know much about the exploding star itself.

Although UGC 678 is not part of the Milky Way, the shape of the galaxy appears similar to our own. UGC 678 has a spiral structure with a starry disk that turns into rotating arms.

The galactic center also has a vertical structure, thanks to which gas and dust are funneled inwards. Astronomers say this structure is similar to the center of the Milky Way, but much weaker.
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