Healthy life : A way to reduce cravings for harmful sweets Healthy life : A way to reduce cravings for harmful sweets

Healthy life : A way to reduce cravings for harmful sweets

Healthy life : A way to reduce cravings for harmful sweets Dr. Yekaterina Kashukh, a gastroenterologist, announced that to overcome the craving for sweets, meat and grains can be eaten.  In an interview with Gazeta.Ru, the doctor notes that people resort to sweets when the body lacks certain nutrients. Therefore, it is important first to determine the completeness of a person's diet, which must contain a sufficient amount of substances that make him feel full for a long time. Because its exclusion is the reason for the emergence of the desire to eat sweets.  According to her, to reduce the craving for sweets, the diet must first of all contain a good proportion of carbohydrates, especially complex ones - whole grains, grains that require cooking for a long period of time, and it is also necessary to have dietary fibers - fruits and vegetables.  She says: "The indispensable component that allows a person to feel full for a long time is protein food - meat, fish, eggs and dairy products, as well as legumes and some grains. The menu should also contain healthy fats - types of marine fish, avocados and various vegetable oils."  According to her, the total ban on sweets will lead to the failure of the attempt to abstain from sweets. Therefore, to reduce the craving for sweets, you must refrain from eating processed ones because they contain a high percentage of sugar and artificial supplements, and eat useful sweets such as dark chocolate and home-made sweets instead.  “The cause of the overeating needs to be determined,” she says. Because stress is often eaten with harmful sweets, as a reward to themselves for their successes, or they use them as consolation for their failures, or as the only way to diversify the boring, monotonous daily life. Therefore, a person must determine what he must change in his life, so that sweets are not the main cause of joy or a means of relaxation, and not to search for how to refrain from eating sweets.           Gusudareva : a clinical nutritionist talks about vitamins that are recommended to be taken before passing important exams    Nutritionist Gusudareva advised taking vitamin (omega-3) to stimulate memory before passing important exams.  Clinical nutritionist Anna Gusudareva stated in an interview with the Gazeta.Ru portal that taking vitamin (omega-3), vitamin Q10, adding foods containing B vitamins and magnesium to the diet all helps to mobilize the brain, which in turn helps Not feeling "crazy" because of anxiety in the pre-exam period.    She said that vitamin (omega-3) helps to overcome excessive excitement and nervous tension. As for vitamin Q10, it produces energy for the mitochondria, as it is an electrical station for cells, which improves cognitive functions. She also recommended taking a course of magnesium salt baths to remove nervous tension.    Neurobiologist Lisa Genova recommended improving brain function by eating fatty fish and egg yolks, and recommended eating other foods rich in phospholipids, antioxidants, vitamins and minerals.    Psychologist Ruslana Zavalikhina explained how the child should be motivated to learn at the end of the school year. "Instead of focusing on grades, the child's aspiration for knowledge should be developed," she said in an interview with Russia's Fifth Channel.                       Benefits for vitamins : You must take vitamin D    Why do we need vitamin D, and should it be taken in the summer also without fear of its high level in the body? Can this vitamin be taken without a prescription?    Dr. Alexander Myasnikov answers these questions on a television program and says: "Pregnant women, children and the elderly should take vitamin D without fear of an increase in its level in the body."    According to him, everyone who suffers from a deficiency in mineral elements should take vitamin D. However, this does not mean that everyone should immediately take an analysis to determine the level of the vitamin in their body, especially those who take it regularly.    "There will not be an overdose of vitamin D, so you can continue taking it," he says.    According to him, it turns out that the results of recent scientific studies regarding the unique properties of vitamin D have disproved many basic facts. And he says: "A person takes vitamin D, but does not feel any effect, so that he does not feel an improvement in bone density, so he can, according to his desire, continue taking the vitamin or not taking it."    Myasnikov stresses the need for pregnant women, children and the elderly to take vitamin D.              An ingredient in tea, apples, and berries can prevent age-related memory loss : The Guardian  A recent study suggests that people who eat a diet rich in flavanols, found in tea, apples and berries, may be less likely to experience age-related memory loss.  A three-year study of 3,562 people aged about 71 found that those who had regular consumption of flavanols had better hippocampal memory function, which includes short-term memory making, than those who didn't.    The study, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, suggested that supplementing with 500 mg of flavanols per day could address the negative effect on memory function caused by low intake of flavanols in the elderly.    However, the researchers confirmed that flavanol supplementation had no effect on people without flavanol deficiency.    Senior researcher Scott Small, a professor of neuroscience at Columbia University, said the findings are part of a growing body of research that is "beginning to reveal that different nutrients are needed to strengthen our aging brains".    The team randomly gave healthy adults either a 500 mg flavanol supplement per day or a dummy pill for three years. Participants underwent several memory tests during the study period and filled out questionnaires that assessed their diet.    The researchers said that memory scores improved only slightly for the group that took flavanols, but within this group there was a subset of people with malnutrition and low consumption of flavanols at the start of the study, who saw their memory scores increase by an average of 10.5% compared to those with lower levels of flavanol intake. placebo, and by 16% compared to the beginning of the study.    The study, funded by food manufacturer Mars, used flavanols extracted from cocoa, although the study authors said eating chocolate is unlikely to provide adequate levels of flavanols, as they are destroyed during processing.    Guenter Connell, professor of nutrition and food science at the University of Reading and co-author of the study, explained that the results "indicate the presence of an ideal amount of flavanols in the diet", which is an intake of about 500 mg per day.    Researchers are divided on whether the study shows that flavanol supplementation is a good idea for older adults.    Professor Aidan Cassidy, Head of Nutrition and Preventive Medicine at Queen's University Belfast, said the study was "really important", especially since the dose required to improve brain health "is easily achievable. For example, one cup of tea, six squares of dark chocolate, Two servings of berries and an apple together provide about 500 mg of flavanols."    The results of this study show the importance of diet as a factor supporting cognitive health later in life, although more studies are needed to explore the benefits of flavanol supplementation in depth.    However, David Curtis, professor emeritus at University College London's Genetic Institute, said the study showed that "those taking flavanol supplements for years had the same memory function as those taking a placebo and any differences were in the predictive range of chance."    He added: "The study fails to provide evidence that increased intake of flavanols is beneficial and there is no need for anyone to consider changing their diet in light of its findings."    Carl Hodgetts, senior lecturer in cognitive neuroscience at Royal Holloway, University of London, said research into the relationship between nutrition and the brain could help combat dementia.    He described the study as "interesting" and "begins to address such questions", but disagreed with the conclusion that flavanol supplementation affected hippocampal function, which would require investigations such as MRI scans to prove this.

Dr. Yekaterina Kashukh, a gastroenterologist, announced that to overcome the craving for sweets, meat and grains can be eaten.

In an interview with Gazeta.Ru, the doctor notes that people resort to sweets when the body lacks certain nutrients. Therefore, it is important first to determine the completeness of a person's diet, which must contain a sufficient amount of substances that make him feel full for a long time. Because its exclusion is the reason for the emergence of the desire to eat sweets.

According to her, to reduce the craving for sweets, the diet must first of all contain a good proportion of carbohydrates, especially complex ones - whole grains, grains that require cooking for a long period of time, and it is also necessary to have dietary fibers - fruits and vegetables.

She says: "The indispensable component that allows a person to feel full for a long time is protein food - meat, fish, eggs and dairy products, as well as legumes and some grains. The menu should also contain healthy fats - types of marine fish, avocados and various vegetable oils."

According to her, the total ban on sweets will lead to the failure of the attempt to abstain from sweets. Therefore, to reduce the craving for sweets, you must refrain from eating processed ones because they contain a high percentage of sugar and artificial supplements, and eat useful sweets such as dark chocolate and home-made sweets instead.

“The cause of the overeating needs to be determined,” she says. Because stress is often eaten with harmful sweets, as a reward to themselves for their successes, or they use them as consolation for their failures, or as the only way to diversify the boring, monotonous daily life. Therefore, a person must determine what he must change in his life, so that sweets are not the main cause of joy or a means of relaxation, and not to search for how to refrain from eating sweets.


Gusudareva : a clinical nutritionist talks about vitamins that are recommended to be taken before passing important exams

Nutritionist Gusudareva advised taking vitamin (omega-3) to stimulate memory before passing important exams.

Clinical nutritionist Anna Gusudareva stated in an interview with the Gazeta.Ru portal that taking vitamin (omega-3), vitamin Q10, adding foods containing B vitamins and magnesium to the diet all helps to mobilize the brain, which in turn helps Not feeling "crazy" because of anxiety in the pre-exam period.

She said that vitamin (omega-3) helps to overcome excessive excitement and nervous tension. As for vitamin Q10, it produces energy for the mitochondria, as it is an electrical station for cells, which improves cognitive functions. She also recommended taking a course of magnesium salt baths to remove nervous tension.

Neurobiologist Lisa Genova recommended improving brain function by eating fatty fish and egg yolks, and recommended eating other foods rich in phospholipids, antioxidants, vitamins and minerals.

Psychologist Ruslana Zavalikhina explained how the child should be motivated to learn at the end of the school year. "Instead of focusing on grades, the child's aspiration for knowledge should be developed," she said in an interview with Russia's Fifth Channel. 


Benefits for vitamins : You must take vitamin D

Why do we need vitamin D, and should it be taken in the summer also without fear of its high level in the body? Can this vitamin be taken without a prescription?

Dr. Alexander Myasnikov answers these questions on a television program and says: "Pregnant women, children and the elderly should take vitamin D without fear of an increase in its level in the body."

According to him, everyone who suffers from a deficiency in mineral elements should take vitamin D. However, this does not mean that everyone should immediately take an analysis to determine the level of the vitamin in their body, especially those who take it regularly.

"There will not be an overdose of vitamin D, so you can continue taking it," he says.

According to him, it turns out that the results of recent scientific studies regarding the unique properties of vitamin D have disproved many basic facts. And he says: "A person takes vitamin D, but does not feel any effect, so that he does not feel an improvement in bone density, so he can, according to his desire, continue taking the vitamin or not taking it."

Myasnikov stresses the need for pregnant women, children and the elderly to take vitamin D.


An ingredient in tea, apples, and berries can prevent age-related memory loss : The Guardian

A recent study suggests that people who eat a diet rich in flavanols, found in tea, apples and berries, may be less likely to experience age-related memory loss.

A three-year study of 3,562 people aged about 71 found that those who had regular consumption of flavanols had better hippocampal memory function, which includes short-term memory making, than those who didn't.

The study, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, suggested that supplementing with 500 mg of flavanols per day could address the negative effect on memory function caused by low intake of flavanols in the elderly.

However, the researchers confirmed that flavanol supplementation had no effect on people without flavanol deficiency.

Senior researcher Scott Small, a professor of neuroscience at Columbia University, said the findings are part of a growing body of research that is "beginning to reveal that different nutrients are needed to strengthen our aging brains".

The team randomly gave healthy adults either a 500 mg flavanol supplement per day or a dummy pill for three years. Participants underwent several memory tests during the study period and filled out questionnaires that assessed their diet.

The researchers said that memory scores improved only slightly for the group that took flavanols, but within this group there was a subset of people with malnutrition and low consumption of flavanols at the start of the study, who saw their memory scores increase by an average of 10.5% compared to those with lower levels of flavanol intake. placebo, and by 16% compared to the beginning of the study.

The study, funded by food manufacturer Mars, used flavanols extracted from cocoa, although the study authors said eating chocolate is unlikely to provide adequate levels of flavanols, as they are destroyed during processing.

Guenter Connell, professor of nutrition and food science at the University of Reading and co-author of the study, explained that the results "indicate the presence of an ideal amount of flavanols in the diet", which is an intake of about 500 mg per day.

Researchers are divided on whether the study shows that flavanol supplementation is a good idea for older adults.

Professor Aidan Cassidy, Head of Nutrition and Preventive Medicine at Queen's University Belfast, said the study was "really important", especially since the dose required to improve brain health "is easily achievable. For example, one cup of tea, six squares of dark chocolate, Two servings of berries and an apple together provide about 500 mg of flavanols."

The results of this study show the importance of diet as a factor supporting cognitive health later in life, although more studies are needed to explore the benefits of flavanol supplementation in depth.

However, David Curtis, professor emeritus at University College London's Genetic Institute, said the study showed that "those taking flavanol supplements for years had the same memory function as those taking a placebo and any differences were in the predictive range of chance."

He added: "The study fails to provide evidence that increased intake of flavanols is beneficial and there is no need for anyone to consider changing their diet in light of its findings."

Carl Hodgetts, senior lecturer in cognitive neuroscience at Royal Holloway, University of London, said research into the relationship between nutrition and the brain could help combat dementia.


He described the study as "interesting" and "begins to address such questions", but disagreed with the conclusion that flavanol supplementation affected hippocampal function, which would require investigations such as MRI scans to prove this.


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