Doctors warn of the dangers of the trend of rubbing lemon on the hair Doctors warn of the dangers of the trend of rubbing lemon on the hair

Doctors warn of the dangers of the trend of rubbing lemon on the hair

Doctors warn of the dangers of the trend of rubbing lemon on the hair

A worrying trend has spread widely on social media, calling for rubbing lemon on the hair to get a distinctive blonde color.

This trend has prompted doctors to reveal its negative effects, as it can lead to a painful medical condition.

NHS surgeon Dr Karan Rajan has warned against rubbing lemon juice into your hair this summer, as he has seen numerous videos showing users trying to bleach their hair naturally with citrus fruits in the sun.

“The citric acid in lemons reacts with the UV rays from the sun and makes hair more sensitive to light,” says Dr Rajan. “This speeds up the breakdown of melanin in the hair, which leads to hair lightening. But the acidity of lemon juice can strip hair of its natural oils, making it dry and brittle. The real problem comes when it reaches your scalp and skin.”

He continued: "Citrus fruits contain chemicals called psoralen, and when they are exposed to sunlight, ultraviolet rays activate psoralen, which leads to a phototoxic reaction that causes inflammation and damage to skin cells. This is known as plant photodermatitis."

Phytophotodermatitis is not a serious condition. But its effects can last for several weeks or even months, according to Healthline.

The condition is caused by contact with a phototoxic plant agent, combined with exposure to ultraviolet radiation such as the sun. Symptoms include erythema (redness of the skin), edema, pustules (vesicles or bullae), and delayed hyperpigmentation, and heat and humidity exacerbate the symptoms.

Over time, the affected areas heal on their own, but can be helped with some treatments. 

“If your skin has come in contact with citrus juice and you have been exposed to the sun for long periods of time, wash the affected areas with soap and water to remove the psoralen,” says Dr. Rajan. “If you are already experiencing symptoms, try cooling compresses and look for over-the-counter antihistamines and hydrocortisone creams to reduce inflammation.”

Post a Comment

Previous Post Next Post

Worldwide News Search HereπŸ‘‡