After the persecution of Muslims, India's Christians are exposed to increasing violence amid ignoring the authorities

After the persecution of Muslims, India's Christians are exposed to increasing violence amid ignoring the authorities  Anti-Christian Hindus have been searching villages, storming churches, burning Christian books, attacking schools and assaulting worshippers, while ignoring and sometimes helping the police and members of India's ruling party.  Angry men wearing saffron necklaces and chanting Hindu slogans stormed a church in the Indian city of Indore, climbed to the podium and started punching priests.  Manish David, an Indian Christian priest, interrupted his prayers in that church following the storming of the Hindus. David told the American newspaper, "The New York Times, " "They kept hitting us and pulling us out of the hair, shouting questions about what we do, what songs we sing, and what we're trying to do?"  Although the police arrived at the church, David asserts that they "did not touch" the assailants, and instead took the priests and worshipers to prison, under pain of a law banning religious conversions.  The priest says, "We weren't converting anyone to Christianity, we were just praying."  India is one of the first Asian countries to enter Christianity, and its Christians represent one of the largest Christian communities on the continent, with a number of about 30 million. However, they are considered a minority because they live in a country of about a billion people.  The rise in attacks on Christians in India is part of a broader shift in which minorities are feeling insecure.  The "New York Times" says that anti-Christians are searching villages, storming churches, burning Christian books, attacking schools and attacking worshipers.  In many cases, they are assisted by the police and members of India's ruling party, according to government documents and dozens of interviews conducted by the same American newspaper.  Many Hindu extremists justify the attacks as a way to prevent religious conversion.  Many Christians are so frightened that they try to masquerade as Hindus to protect themselves from the escalating violence.  Sectarian violence in India is taking place more widely and violently against Indian Muslims, while anti-Christian forces are getting stronger day by day.  Last September, a mob of young workers stormed the Chhattisgarh police station, threw shoes at two priests and beat them in front of police officers, with little to no intervention.  The conversion law in some states punishes with up to ten years in prison anyone found to have carried out illegal "religious conversions."  Modi faces mounting international pressure to rein in his supporters and stop the persecution of Muslims and Christians.

After the persecution of Muslims, India's Christians are exposed to increasing violence amid ignoring the authorities

Anti-Christian Hindus have been searching villages, storming churches, burning Christian books, attacking schools and assaulting worshippers, while ignoring and sometimes helping the police and members of India's ruling party.

Angry men wearing saffron necklaces and chanting Hindu slogans stormed a church in the Indian city of Indore, climbed to the podium and started punching priests.

Manish David, an Indian Christian priest, interrupted his prayers in that church following the storming of the Hindus. David told the American newspaper, "The New York Times, " "They kept hitting us and pulling us out of the hair, shouting questions about what we do, what songs we sing, and what we're trying to do?"

Although the police arrived at the church, David asserts that they "did not touch" the assailants, and instead took the priests and worshipers to prison, under pain of a law banning religious conversions.

The priest says, "We weren't converting anyone to Christianity, we were just praying."

India is one of the first Asian countries to enter Christianity, and its Christians represent one of the largest Christian communities on the continent, with a number of about 30 million. However, they are considered a minority because they live in a country of about a billion people.

The rise in attacks on Christians in India is part of a broader shift in which minorities are feeling insecure.

The "New York Times" says that anti-Christians are searching villages, storming churches, burning Christian books, attacking schools and attacking worshipers.

In many cases, they are assisted by the police and members of India's ruling party, according to government documents and dozens of interviews conducted by the same American newspaper.

Many Hindu extremists justify the attacks as a way to prevent religious conversion.

Many Christians are so frightened that they try to masquerade as Hindus to protect themselves from the escalating violence

Sectarian violence in India is taking place more widely and violently against Indian Muslims, while anti-Christian forces are getting stronger day by day.

Last September, a mob of young workers stormed the Chhattisgarh police station, threw shoes at two priests and beat them in front of police officers, with little to no intervention.

The conversion law in some states punishes with up to ten years in prison anyone found to have carried out illegal "religious conversions."

Modi faces mounting international pressure to rein in his supporters and stop the persecution of Muslims and Christians.

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