London-based startup Bellwether Industries has released footage of the first flight of a prototype of its Volar eVTOL private flying car.

London-based startup Bellwether Industries has released footage of the first flight of a prototype of its Volar eVTOL private flying car.  The company did not reveal much about the specifications of the miniature model, which they internally call the "antelope" symbol.  E-VETOL is an acronym for electric vertical take-off and landing technology.  This technology came about thanks to significant advances in electric propulsion and the growing need for new vehicles for urban air mobility.  Bellweather has conducted at least 8 initial flight tests, and the company aims to bring its E-Vitol-powered aircraft to market as a private vehicle by 2028.  Designed to allow travel in a private jet, the final version will be approximately 10.5 feet (3.2 meters) wide and will accommodate up to five passengers.  On the other hand, the smaller version appears to have room for only one passenger and is remotely piloted, in the first test shots published by Bellweather.  In a previous report, the prototype flew up to 13 feet (3.9 meters) at approximately 25 mph (40 km/h).  The prototype looked a bit shaky in flight, although it's important to stress that this is an early test model.  As Bill Weather says in the video, these tests will provide invaluable data to help them improve their flight system.  Bellweather demonstrated its Antelope prototype at the Dubai Air Show in 2021. The company has so far raised $1 million from investors and is now seeking further investment to develop its full-size model.  "We believe that mobility of people in the sky will become a reality within the next 10 years," the company says on its website. "Therefore, we are creating an option for anyone to fly anytime, anywhere to any point. The ultimate goal of the leading industries is to build a new lifestyle and lead the world." towards a more inclusive urban mobility”.  According to Bill Weather, the final "Vollar" prototype will cruise at altitudes of about 3,000 feet and reach a speed of 135 miles per hour (217 km/h).  The battery life is expected to be up to 90 minutes, which is similar to flying taxi models, such as the Lilium's plane, which also uses E-VTOL technology.  Much work remains on the Bellweather prototype, and even other flying taxi companies such as Volocopter still need to obtain flight certification before they can launch their planned services in 2023.  However, countless videos of the test flight show that e-Vitol navigation is now likely a matter of time.

London-based startup Bellwether Industries has released footage of the first flight of a prototype of its Volar eVTOL private flying car.


The company did not reveal much about the specifications of the miniature model, which they internally call the "antelope" symbol.

E-VETOL is an acronym for electric vertical take-off and landing technology.

This technology came about thanks to significant advances in electric propulsion and the growing need for new vehicles for urban air mobility.

Bellweather has conducted at least 8 initial flight tests, and the company aims to bring its E-Vitol-powered aircraft to market as a private vehicle by 2028.

Designed to allow travel in a private jet, the final version will be approximately 10.5 feet (3.2 meters) wide and will accommodate up to five passengers.

On the other hand, the smaller version appears to have room for only one passenger and is remotely piloted, in the first test shots published by Bellweather.

In a previous report, the prototype flew up to 13 feet (3.9 meters) at approximately 25 mph (40 km/h).

The prototype looked a bit shaky in flight, although it's important to stress that this is an early test model.

As Bill Weather says in the video, these tests will provide invaluable data to help them improve their flight system.

Bellweather demonstrated its Antelope prototype at the Dubai Air Show in 2021. The company has so far raised $1 million from investors and is now seeking further investment to develop its full-size model.

"We believe that mobility of people in the sky will become a reality within the next 10 years," the company says on its website. "Therefore, we are creating an option for anyone to fly anytime, anywhere to any point. The ultimate goal of the leading industries is to build a new lifestyle and lead the world." towards a more inclusive urban mobility”.

According to Bill Weather, the final "Vollar" prototype will cruise at altitudes of about 3,000 feet and reach a speed of 135 miles per hour (217 km/h).

The battery life is expected to be up to 90 minutes, which is similar to flying taxi models, such as the Lilium's plane, which also uses E-VTOL technology.

Much work remains on the Bellweather prototype, and even other flying taxi companies such as Volocopter still need to obtain flight certification before they can launch their planned services in 2023.

However, countless videos of the test flight show that e-Vitol navigation is now likely a matter of time.
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