The demolition of 12,000 homes and facilities in 5 years Bulldozing and harassment is Israel's policy to displace the Negev Bedouins

The demolition of 12,000 homes and facilities in 5 years Bulldozing and harassment is Israel's policy to displace the Negev Bedouins  Bulldozing and harassment aim to restrict the population and cut off any geographical contact between the Bedouin villages, by planting settlements and individual farms on Arab lands facing the encroaching Judaization.  Occupied Jerusalem - Sheikh Suleiman al-Atrash has passed his eighties without settling in a house that shelters his families in the village of al-Atrash in the Negev, which is engaged in a battle to confront the bulldozing and infringement (planting of woodland trees) of the lands, which the Israeli authorities have initiated in the area known as the “Beersheba Naqa’.” It includes 6 unrecognized villages.  Sheikh al-Atrash does not remember the year in which he was born, but he is sure that he is older than Israel, as he was a child - and he was the youngest of his brothers - when the catastrophe occurred in 1948, when his mother embraced him in her bosom when members of the Jewish gangs stormed the village of al-Atrash near the city of Beersheba, and barricaded himself with Her children, like many of the families of the clan, live in tents, clinging to their land in the Negev.  The population of the Bedouin in the Negev in 1948 amounted to more than 100,000 people, most of whom were forcibly displaced, as Jewish gangs migrated them to the Gaza Strip, Sinai and Jordan, while 11,000 people remained and were grouped into an area that Israel called "the fence".  The area of ​​the Negev extends to 14,230 square kilometers, or 68% of the area of ​​Palestine 48, which is 20,770 square kilometers. fallow in 1921, while today they live on 300,000 acres.   Dredging work At the beginning of this year, marking the 74th anniversary of the Nakba, the Israeli establishment began to seize and confiscate 800,000 dunams of the Bedouin residents’ ownership in the villages deprived of recognition, by resuming the razing work by the bulldozers of the Permanent Fund of Israel (Kakal), of the lands of the village Al-Atrash extends over an area of ​​45,000 acres and is inhabited by 7,000 people.  In a battle of hit and run that spanned for 3 days on the lands of the village of al-Atrash, between the young men and the special units of the Israeli police, which provided protection and guard for the bulldozers that destroyed agricultural crops and razed hundreds of dunams in preparation for their displacement, Sheikh al-Atrash moved in the confrontation arena, perhaps forming a shield and a fortress for the children and young people who were victims of attacks The repression and arrest of the Israeli police.  Despite his advanced age, the sheikh in his eighties seemed to move between the solidarity activists and the defenders of the land, with his greatest understanding of protecting young people and children from the oppression of the Israeli police.  Sheikh al-Atrash told Al-Jazeera Net, "These are our lands before the establishment of Israel, and we have title deeds from the Ottoman era, and recognition documents of our ownership of lands from the British Mandate, but Israel wants to occupy our lands and displace us."  Displacement scheme Sheikh al-Atrash - who owns 300 dunams that he inherited from his father and has been cultivating and raising livestock there - recalls decades of suffering and restrictions that included demolishing tin houses, destroying agricultural crops, spraying them with chemicals and poisoning livestock. He says, "All the policies of the Israeli authorities aimed at displacing us and confiscating our lands have failed, and have not undermined our determination and steadfastness, and it is a message that we pass on to our children and grandchildren of steadfastness and survival in the land."  Despite this steadfastness, the octogenarian Sheikh expresses his fear of what the future will hold for his grandchildren, saying, "No one knows how events will develop in the Negev, whose residents live in the scheme of displacement and focus on the least area of ​​land.  Sheikh al-Atrash - who lives with his family in a tin house - embodies the reality of the 150,000 residents of 35 villages not recognized by Israel, out of the 300,000 Arabs living in the Negev, where the residents are fighting a battle to preserve existence, with the launch of the Israeli government The "green settlement" project in the heart of Bedouin residential communities, with the establishment of 12 new settlements and dozens of individual farms for Jews.  Battle of the Negev Despite the Nakba, the head of the “citizen” movement in the Negev, Abed Abu Kaf, says, “Israel has not won the battle in the Negev desert. the earth".  Abu Kaf explains to Al Jazeera Net that the bulldozing of lands in the villages stripped of recognition is another facet of the slow displacement of the Bedouin population, and their robbery of their lands and their use for settlement and Judaization projects, saying that "the Israeli establishment has declared war on the Bedouins in the Negev, so what is happening is ethnic cleansing, through demolition, bulldozing, and uprooting." Displacement of residents in the open, in order to force them to live in fixed towns.  In an effort to impose sovereignty on Bedouin lands and confiscate them and gather the population on the least amount of land, Abu Kaf says, “In the early seventies of the last century, the Israeli authorities announced the decree of land settlement and registration of state ownership.” They also established 9 stable towns and villages to group and concentrate the Bedouins, namely: Rahat Lakiya, Kuseifa, Hura, Tell Al-Sabaa, Ararat Al-Naqab, Shaqib Al-Salam, Al-Qaisum Council, and the Desert Oasis Council.  Today, Abu Kaf says, "Israeli towns and Jewish regional councils in the Negev control 12,000 square kilometers, which constitutes 86% of the area of ​​the Negev, and the recognized Arab local authorities have only a small part of its area that does not exceed 150,000 dunams, and the same for villages that have been stripped of recognition." Which constitutes about 2% of the area of ​​the Negev.  Creeping lullaby For his part, the head of the Regional Council for Unrecognized Villages, Attia Al-Asam, reviews Israeli plans at the expense of the Arab presence in the de-recognized villages whose residents own more than 800,000 dunams.  Al-Asam warns - in his speech to Al-Jazeera Net - of the repercussions of the razing of lands in the Negev, especially in the villages stripped of recognition in the "fence" area.  He asserts that the bulldozing and harassment of lands aims to restrict the population and cut off any geographic communication between the Bedouin villages, by planting settlements and individual farms on Arab lands facing the encroaching Judaization.  Al-Asam explains that the bulldozing and harassment of lands are in addition to the demolitions carried out by the Israeli authorities, as between 2015 and 2020, more than 12,000 homes and residential facilities were demolished in the villages stripped of recognition, while the establishment of 12 new settlements and dozens of individual farms for Jews were announced.  He points out that the Israeli authorities are targeting the Arab presence in the Negev, and are adopting a policy of creeping displacement with the residents of villages stolen from recognition in order to force them to migrate and gather them in existing towns on the least amount of land. He stressed that the consensus in the Negev is to reject any settlement, to insist on Israeli recognition of the villages stripped of recognition, and to establish the Bedouin citizens' ownership of 800,000 dunams.

The demolition of 12,000 homes and facilities in 5 years Bulldozing and harassment is Israel's policy to displace the Negev Bedouins

Bulldozing and harassment aim to restrict the population and cut off any geographical contact between the Bedouin villages, by planting settlements and individual farms on Arab lands facing the encroaching Judaization.

Occupied Jerusalem - Sheikh Suleiman al-Atrash has passed his eighties without settling in a house that shelters his families in the village of al-Atrash in the Negev, which is engaged in a battle to confront the bulldozing and infringement (planting of woodland trees) of the lands, which the Israeli authorities have initiated in the area known as the “Beersheba Naqa’.” It includes 6 unrecognized villages.

Sheikh al-Atrash does not remember the year in which he was born, but he is sure that he is older than Israel, as he was a child - and he was the youngest of his brothers - when the catastrophe occurred in 1948, when his mother embraced him in her bosom when members of the Jewish gangs stormed the village of al-Atrash near the city of Beersheba, and barricaded himself with Her children, like many of the families of the clan, live in tents, clinging to their land in the Negev.

The population of the Bedouin in the Negev in 1948 amounted to more than 100,000 people, most of whom were forcibly displaced, as Jewish gangs migrated them to the Gaza Strip, Sinai and Jordan, while 11,000 people remained and were grouped into an area that Israel called "the fence".

The area of ​​the Negev extends to 14,230 square kilometers, or 68% of the area of ​​Palestine 48, which is 20,770 square kilometers. fallow in 1921, while today they live on 300,000 acres.

Dredging work

At the beginning of this year, marking the 74th anniversary of the Nakba, the Israeli establishment began to seize and confiscate 800,000 dunams of the Bedouin residents’ ownership in the villages deprived of recognition, by resuming the razing work by the bulldozers of the Permanent Fund of Israel (Kakal), of the lands of the village Al-Atrash extends over an area of ​​45,000 acres and is inhabited by 7,000 people.

In a battle of hit and run that spanned for 3 days on the lands of the village of al-Atrash, between the young men and the special units of the Israeli police, which provided protection and guard for the bulldozers that destroyed agricultural crops and razed hundreds of dunams in preparation for their displacement, Sheikh al-Atrash moved in the confrontation arena, perhaps forming a shield and a fortress for the children and young people who were victims of attacks The repression and arrest of the Israeli police.

Despite his advanced age, the sheikh in his eighties seemed to move between the solidarity activists and the defenders of the land, with his greatest understanding of protecting young people and children from the oppression of the Israeli police.

Sheikh al-Atrash told Al-Jazeera Net, "These are our lands before the establishment of Israel, and we have title deeds from the Ottoman era, and recognition documents of our ownership of lands from the British Mandate, but Israel wants to occupy our lands and displace us."

Displacement scheme

Sheikh al-Atrash - who owns 300 dunams that he inherited from his father and has been cultivating and raising livestock there - recalls decades of suffering and restrictions that included demolishing tin houses, destroying agricultural crops, spraying them with chemicals and poisoning livestock. He says, "All the policies of the Israeli authorities aimed at displacing us and confiscating our lands have failed, and have not undermined our determination and steadfastness, and it is a message that we pass on to our children and grandchildren of steadfastness and survival in the land."

Despite this steadfastness, the octogenarian Sheikh expresses his fear of what the future will hold for his grandchildren, saying, "No one knows how events will develop in the Negev, whose residents live in the scheme of displacement and focus on the least area of ​​land.

Sheikh al-Atrash - who lives with his family in a tin house - embodies the reality of the 150,000 residents of 35 villages not recognized by Israel, out of the 300,000 Arabs living in the Negev, where the residents are fighting a battle to preserve existence, with the launch of the Israeli government The "green settlement" project in the heart of Bedouin residential communities, with the establishment of 12 new settlements and dozens of individual farms for Jews.

Battle of the Negev

Despite the Nakba, the head of the “citizen” movement in the Negev, Abed Abu Kaf, says, “Israel has not won the battle in the Negev desert. the earth".

Abu Kaf explains to Al Jazeera Net that the bulldozing of lands in the villages stripped of recognition is another facet of the slow displacement of the Bedouin population, and their robbery of their lands and their use for settlement and Judaization projects, saying that "the Israeli establishment has declared war on the Bedouins in the Negev, so what is happening is ethnic cleansing, through demolition, bulldozing, and uprooting." Displacement of residents in the open, in order to force them to live in fixed towns.

In an effort to impose sovereignty on Bedouin lands and confiscate them and gather the population on the least amount of land, Abu Kaf says, “In the early seventies of the last century, the Israeli authorities announced the decree of land settlement and registration of state ownership.” They also established 9 stable towns and villages to group and concentrate the Bedouins, namely: Rahat Lakiya, Kuseifa, Hura, Tell Al-Sabaa, Ararat Al-Naqab, Shaqib Al-Salam, Al-Qaisum Council, and the Desert Oasis Council.

Today, Abu Kaf says, "Israeli towns and Jewish regional councils in the Negev control 12,000 square kilometers, which constitutes 86% of the area of ​​the Negev, and the recognized Arab local authorities have only a small part of its area that does not exceed 150,000 dunams, and the same for villages that have been stripped of recognition." Which constitutes about 2% of the area of ​​the Negev.

Creeping lullaby

For his part, the head of the Regional Council for Unrecognized Villages, Attia Al-Asam, reviews Israeli plans at the expense of the Arab presence in the de-recognized villages whose residents own more than 800,000 dunams.

Al-Asam warns - in his speech to Al-Jazeera Net - of the repercussions of the razing of lands in the Negev, especially in the villages stripped of recognition in the "fence" area.

He asserts that the bulldozing and harassment of lands aims to restrict the population and cut off any geographic communication between the Bedouin villages, by planting settlements and individual farms on Arab lands facing the encroaching Judaization.

Al-Asam explains that the bulldozing and harassment of lands are in addition to the demolitions carried out by the Israeli authorities, as between 2015 and 2020, more than 12,000 homes and residential facilities were demolished in the villages stripped of recognition, while the establishment of 12 new settlements and dozens of individual farms for Jews were announced.

He points out that the Israeli authorities are targeting the Arab presence in the Negev, and are adopting a policy of creeping displacement with the residents of villages stolen from recognition in order to force them to migrate and gather them in existing towns on the least amount of land. He stressed that the consensus in the Negev is to reject any settlement, to insist on Israeli recognition of the villages stripped of recognition, and to establish the Bedouin citizens' ownership of 800,000 dunams.

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