"Barbaric behaviour" an Algerian player subjected to racist chants in France

"Barbaric behaviour" an Algerian player subjected to racist chants in France  Algerian international football player Youssef Belaili was subjected to racist chants in a French stadium, which was condemned by the Algerian Football Federation, describing this behavior as "barbaric".  The Algerian Football Federation condemned on Tuesday the exposure of its international player, Youssef Belaili, to racist chants in a French stadium, describing this behavior as "barbaric".  The Federation said, in a statement, that it "provides its steadfast support to international player Youssef Belaili, after he was subjected to racist chants during the match that brought his club Brest against Reims at the latter's stadium in the French First Division."  He added that he "condemns this barbaric and backward behavior of the fans, which contradicts fair play."  And on Sunday, French media reported that Blaili was subjected to racist chants during his team's meeting with Brest at Reims Stadium, in the twenty-fifth round of the French League.  The two teams tied with a goal each, and Blaili missed a penalty kick in the 53rd minute, after which chants began against him from the fans of the host team (Reims), including: "Here is France, go back to your country."  Brest club announced in a statement that it had opened an investigation after news that its player Blaili had been subjected to racist chants and insults.  Blaili moved to Brest this winter, and played with him three matches, during which he made one goal and did not score yet.

"Barbaric behaviour" an Algerian player subjected to racist chants in France


Algerian international football player Youssef Belaili was subjected to racist chants in a French stadium, which was condemned by the Algerian Football Federation, describing this behavior as "barbaric".

The Algerian Football Federation condemned on Tuesday the exposure of its international player, Youssef Belaili, to racist chants in a French stadium, describing this behavior as "barbaric".

The Federation said, in a statement, that it "provides its steadfast support to international player Youssef Belaili, after he was subjected to racist chants during the match that brought his club Brest against Reims at the latter's stadium in the French First Division."

He added that he "condemns this barbaric and backward behavior of the fans, which contradicts fair play."

And on Sunday, French media reported that Blaili was subjected to racist chants during his team's meeting with Brest at Reims Stadium, in the twenty-fifth round of the French League.

The two teams tied with a goal each, and Blaili missed a penalty kick in the 53rd minute, after which chants began against him from the fans of the host team (Reims), including: "Here is France, go back to your country."

Brest club announced in a statement that it had opened an investigation after news that its player Blaili had been subjected to racist chants and insults.

Blaili moved to Brest this winter, and played with him three matches, during which he made one goal and did not score yet.

European shares fall to 7-month lows due to Ukraine  Shares in major European markets fell to their lowest level in seven months, at the opening of trading Tuesday, on the impact of the escalation of the Russian-Ukrainian crisis, which prompted Western countries to announce their intention to impose sanctions on Moscow.  European shares fell in early trading on Tuesday to their lowest levels in seven months, as investors worried about the possibility of economic sanctions against Russia, which has ordered the deployment of troops in two separatist regions in eastern Ukraine.  The pan-European Stoxx 600 index fell 1.7% by 08:10 GMT, falling for the fourth consecutive session. The index is down about 10% from its all-time high in early January.  The German stock index DAX seemed more affected than other European indices due to Germany's heavy dependence on Russian gas supplies and the lack of energy companies listed on the index, which fell by 2.2%.  The broader euro zone index fell 2.1%, while Britain's FTSE 100 index fell 1.2%. Investors are turning to relatively safe assets such as gold and government bonds, while the United States and its European allies are about to announce tough new sanctions against Russia.  While oil and gas stocks rose 0.7%, there were fears in the markets that higher commodity prices would add to inflation fears.  Auto stocks and banks were the worst performers among European stocks, falling 2.7% and 3.1%, respectively.

European shares fall to 7-month lows due to Ukraine


Shares in major European markets fell to their lowest level in seven months, at the opening of trading Tuesday, on the impact of the escalation of the Russian-Ukrainian crisis, which prompted Western countries to announce their intention to impose sanctions on Moscow.

European shares fell in early trading on Tuesday to their lowest levels in seven months, as investors worried about the possibility of economic sanctions against Russia, which has ordered the deployment of troops in two separatist regions in eastern Ukraine.

The pan-European Stoxx 600 index fell 1.7% by 08:10 GMT, falling for the fourth consecutive session. The index is down about 10% from its all-time high in early January.

The German stock index DAX seemed more affected than other European indices due to Germany's heavy dependence on Russian gas supplies and the lack of energy companies listed on the index, which fell by 2.2%.

The broader euro zone index fell 2.1%, while Britain's FTSE 100 index fell 1.2%.
Investors are turning to relatively safe assets such as gold and government bonds, while the United States and its European allies are about to announce tough new sanctions against Russia.

While oil and gas stocks rose 0.7%, there were fears in the markets that higher commodity prices would add to inflation fears.

Auto stocks and banks were the worst performers among European stocks, falling 2.7% and 3.1%, respectively.

Le Figaro: The “deep state” is back in control in Algeria  Paris - Under the headline “In Algeria, the deep state returns to control,” the French newspaper “Le Figaro” said that Algeria’s Intelligence and Security Service (the intelligence service) returned strongly to the scene after being marginalized by the former army chief during movement. Le Figaro added that this apparatus , which was "dissolved" in 2015 by former President Abdelaziz Bouteflika, who wanted to get rid of the men who brought him to power, did not eventually die. Since Bouteflika's resignation, men from the military and civilian authorities have tried to operate the machine, but the attempt was initially unsuccessful, and she said it took just over two years to realize that the skills and expertise of the machines were needed.  Algeria's Intelligence and Security Service (the intelligence service) has returned with force to the scene after being marginalized by the former army chief during the movement  Behind the words - “Le Figaro” adds - there are many very well-known names, led by Mohamed Mediene, nicknamed General Tawfiq, who headed the DRS for twenty-five years, and was acquitted and released early last year, after being imprisoned for “conspiracy to undermine the authority of The state and the army.  The newspaper pointed out that the name of General Khaled Nizar, former chief of staff and former defense minister, who returned to Algeria last December from Spain where he was a refugee after being accused of conspiracy and disturbing public order in 2019, is also being circulated. of justice. Last week, he was heard by the Swiss judiciary, who could try him for “complicity in war crimes and crimes against humanity during the “black decade.” Le Figaro indicated that Tawfiq and Khaled Nizar were among the generals who annulled in January 1992 the electoral victory of the Islamic Salvation Front to prevent Islamists from gaining power.  And for those who witnessed the settling of scores within the systemSince 2019 - continues "Le Figaro" - these rehabilitations are justified by the "need to repair the damage" caused by the former army chief, the late General Ahmed Gaid Salah, and "the attempt to return oil to a machine that has become brutal."  These rehabs are justified by the "need to repair the damage" and "attempting to return oil to a machine that has become brutal" General Gaid Salah, who was at the helm of the country during the 2019 Hirak protests and pushed President Abdelaziz Bouteflika to resign, led an anti-corruption campaign that sent to prison dozens of ministers, business leaders and senior officers. To do so, he “pushed the army to a level of crisis it had not known since the 1990s (ten years of the war on terror), by creating civil wars within the institution. And because of his jealousy about the continuation of General Tawfiq's networks, General Gaid Salah tried to monopolize the state, the army and the apparatus, as the newspaper quotes a former high-ranking employee in the Algerian state, whose name it did not mention. The latter adds, “We hear that they (members of the DRS) have returned to work, but this is exaggerated, as we are qualified in certain political circles. They don't decide anything. They are only consulted, and listened to, because they embody the standards.  "We see very clearly the refocusing of key intelligence structures in the hands of those who led the war on terror in the 1990s," notes a former senior state executive. The latter regrets the “inability of the Algerian regime to find other human cadres capable of leading the country towards a transitional phase in which former military figures do not play such a central role.” As an example of this movement, the price of reassigning many operational staff in the war on terror in the 1990s to sensitive positions.

Le Figaro: The “deep state” is back in control in Algeria


Paris - Under the headline “In Algeria, the deep state returns to control,” the French newspaper “Le Figaro” said that Algeria’s Intelligence and Security Service (the intelligence service) returned strongly to the scene after being marginalized by the former army chief during movement.

Le Figaro added that this apparatus , which was "dissolved" in 2015 by former President Abdelaziz Bouteflika, who wanted to get rid of the men who brought him to power, did not eventually die. Since Bouteflika's resignation, men from the military and civilian authorities have tried to operate the machine, but the attempt was initially unsuccessful, and she said it took just over two years to realize that the skills and expertise of the machines were needed.

Algeria's Intelligence and Security Service (the intelligence service) has returned with force to the scene after being marginalized by the former army chief during the movement

Behind the words - “Le Figaro” adds - there are many very well-known names, led by Mohamed Mediene, nicknamed General Tawfiq, who headed the DRS for twenty-five years, and was acquitted and released early last year, after being imprisoned for “conspiracy to undermine the authority of The state and the army.

The newspaper pointed out that the name of General Khaled Nizar, former chief of staff and former defense minister, who returned to Algeria last December from Spain where he was a refugee after being accused of conspiracy and disturbing public order in 2019, is also being circulated. of justice.
Last week, he was heard by the Swiss judiciary, who could try him for “complicity in war crimes and crimes against humanity during the “black decade.” Le Figaro indicated that Tawfiq and Khaled Nizar were among the generals who annulled in January 1992 the electoral victory of the Islamic Salvation Front to prevent Islamists from gaining power.

And for those who witnessed the settling of scores within the systemSince 2019 - continues "Le Figaro" - these rehabilitations are justified by the "need to repair the damage" caused by the former army chief, the late General Ahmed Gaid Salah, and "the attempt to return oil to a machine that has become brutal."

These rehabs are justified by the "need to repair the damage" and "attempting to return oil to a machine that has become brutal"
General Gaid Salah, who was at the helm of the country during the 2019 Hirak protests and pushed President Abdelaziz Bouteflika to resign, led an anti-corruption campaign that sent to prison dozens of ministers, business leaders and senior officers. To do so, he “pushed the army to a level of crisis it had not known since the 1990s (ten years of the war on terror), by creating civil wars within the institution. And because of his jealousy about the continuation of General Tawfiq's networks, General Gaid Salah tried to monopolize the state, the army and the apparatus, as the newspaper quotes a former high-ranking employee in the Algerian state, whose name it did not mention. The latter adds, “We hear that they (members of the DRS) have returned to work, but this is exaggerated, as we are qualified in certain political circles. They don't decide anything. They are only consulted, and listened to, because they embody the standards.

"We see very clearly the refocusing of key intelligence structures in the hands of those who led the war on terror in the 1990s," notes a former senior state executive. The latter regrets the “inability of the Algerian regime to find other human cadres capable of leading the country towards a transitional phase in which former military figures do not play such a central role.” As an example of this movement, the price of reassigning many operational staff in the war on terror in the 1990s to sensitive positions.
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