'Extremely worrying' British activists denounce arrests of anti-monarchy

'Extremely worrying' British activists denounce arrests of anti-monarchy  Human rights activists described the recent campaign of arrests carried out by the British police, of demonstrators and protesters, in conjunction with the death of Queen Elizabeth and the inauguration of King Charles, as a very dangerous and disturbing matter. Meanwhile, security officials confirmed that they face a huge challenge to control security.  Activists in Britain denounced the arrest of anti-monarchy protesters after the death of Queen Elizabeth II, and considered it "very worrying."  Police in Scotland have arrested two people over allegations of peace violations, while a man has been arrested before being released in Oxford.  The arrests coincided with events marking the death of the Queen and the proclamation of Charles III as the new king of Britain.  The authorities have charged a 22-year-old woman with violating the peace, after she was arrested while announcing the king's inauguration outside St Giles' Cathedral in Edinburgh.  She was later released and is due to appear in court in the Scottish capital at a later time.  A 45-year-old man was also detained on suspicion of committing a public order offense after shouting, "Who elected him?" During another ad in Oxford.  Thames Valley police said the accused was later released and had "voluntarily" assisted officers.  On Monday, authorities arrested a 22-year-old man in connection with a "violation of the peace", after he was said to have disturbed Prince Andrew as the royal motorcade drove down Edinburgh's Royal Mile.  On this front, Ruth Smith, chief executive of the Watchdog Index, said the arrests were "extremely worrying."  "We must be careful not to use this event, by accident or on purpose, to undermine in any way the freedom of expression enjoyed by the citizens of this country," she added.  Silky Carlo, director of Big Brother Watch, said police officers "have a duty to protect people's right to protest as much as they have a duty to facilitate people's right to express their support, grief or respect."  Judy Beck, Liberty's policy and campaigns officer, said it was "extremely concerning to see police imposing their broad powers in a harsh and punitive manner." "Protest is not a gift from the state, it is a fundamental right," she added.  On Monday, police removed a protester who had been holding a banner reading "Not mine" in front of Parliament in London before the king's arrival.  The Metropolitan Police said that a member of the public was asked to move away from Parliament "in order to facilitate the entry and exit of vehicles through the gates", but that he was not arrested or asked to leave the wider area.  "The public is fully entitled to protest, and we have made this clear to all officers involved in the extraordinary policing operation currently underway," said a statement from Deputy Assistant Commissioner of the Metropolitan Police Stuart Conde.  And the authorities allocated about 1,500 soldiers, along with police and civilians, to deal with the huge numbers of people expected to arrive in London during the next week.  Metropolitan Police Commissioner Mark Rowley said his force faced a "tremendous challenge".  "We will have a safe event, but we will pay thousands of officers because of the level of security required and millions of people who want to express their condolences," he added.

Human rights activists described the recent campaign of arrests carried out by the British police, of demonstrators and protesters, in conjunction with the death of Queen Elizabeth and the inauguration of King Charles, as a very dangerous and disturbing matter. Meanwhile, security officials confirmed that they face a huge challenge to control security.

Activists in Britain denounced the arrest of anti-monarchy protesters after the death of Queen Elizabeth II, and considered it "very worrying."

Police in Scotland have arrested two people over allegations of peace violations, while a man has been arrested before being released in Oxford.

The arrests coincided with events marking the death of the Queen and the proclamation of Charles III as the new king of Britain.

The authorities have charged a 22-year-old woman with violating the peace, after she was arrested while announcing the king's inauguration outside St Giles' Cathedral in Edinburgh.

She was later released and is due to appear in court in the Scottish capital at a later time.

A 45-year-old man was also detained on suspicion of committing a public order offense after shouting, "Who elected him?" During another ad in Oxford.

Thames Valley police said the accused was later released and had "voluntarily" assisted officers.

On Monday, authorities arrested a 22-year-old man in connection with a "violation of the peace", after he was said to have disturbed Prince Andrew as the royal motorcade drove down Edinburgh's Royal Mile.

On this front, Ruth Smith, chief executive of the Watchdog Index, said the arrests were "extremely worrying."

"We must be careful not to use this event, by accident or on purpose, to undermine in any way the freedom of expression enjoyed by the citizens of this country," she added.

Silky Carlo, director of Big Brother Watch, said police officers "have a duty to protect people's right to protest as much as they have a duty to facilitate people's right to express their support, grief or respect."

Judy Beck, Liberty's policy and campaigns officer, said it was "extremely concerning to see police imposing their broad powers in a harsh and punitive manner." "Protest is not a gift from the state, it is a fundamental right," she added.

On Monday, police removed a protester who had been holding a banner reading "Not mine" in front of Parliament in London before the king's arrival.

The Metropolitan Police said that a member of the public was asked to move away from Parliament "in order to facilitate the entry and exit of vehicles through the gates", but that he was not arrested or asked to leave the wider area.

"The public is fully entitled to protest, and we have made this clear to all officers involved in the extraordinary policing operation currently underway," said a statement from Deputy Assistant Commissioner of the Metropolitan Police Stuart Conde.

And the authorities allocated about 1,500 soldiers, along with police and civilians, to deal with the huge numbers of people expected to arrive in London during the next week.

Metropolitan Police Commissioner Mark Rowley said his force faced a "tremendous challenge".

"We will have a safe event, but we will pay thousands of officers because of the level of security required and millions of people who want to express their condolences," he added.
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