The Independent : The recording of mysterious sounds of "unknown" origin in the Earth's atmosphere baffles scientists The Independent : The recording of mysterious sounds of "unknown" origin in the Earth's atmosphere baffles scientists

The Independent : The recording of mysterious sounds of "unknown" origin in the Earth's atmosphere baffles scientists

The Independent : The recording of mysterious sounds of "unknown" origin in the Earth's atmosphere baffles scientists  Hot air balloons have recorded mysterious sounds of "completely unknown" origin high in Earth's atmosphere.  Scientists, including Daniel Bowman of Sandia National Laboratories in the US, have sent large balloons 6-7 meters long into the stratosphere, the relatively quiet layer of the Earth's atmosphere located between 10 and 50 km above the Earth's surface that is rarely affected by aircraft or aircraft. unrest.  In this layer of Earth's outer atmosphere, science instruments on balloons can pick up a range of sounds not heard anywhere else, including the natural sounds of crashing ocean waves and thunder, as well as man-made sounds, such as wind turbines or explosions.  While balloons can detect such human and environmental sounds, the scientists reported that they were also able to record some strange sounds that could not be recognized.  They discovered a mysterious noise of unknown origin. According to the team, "ultrasonic" noise is inaudible to the human ear, like infrared light that is invisible to the human eye.  He revealed that when the sound was recorded with specialized tools and sped up several thousand times, it sounded like muffled whispers.  The scientists separated this mysterious noise from other sounds picked up from the area, such as the sound of ocean waves crashing into each other.  "In the stratosphere there are mysterious ultrasound signals that occur a few times an hour, but their origin is completely unknown," Dr. Bowman said in a statement.  The balloons, originally designed to monitor volcanoes on Earth, can collect data and detect low-frequency infrasound waves using micrometers.  Scientists have tracked these balloons using the Global Positioning System (GPS) so they can sometimes travel hundreds of miles and land in hard-to-reach places.  Dr Bowman explained: "When the sun shines on the dark balloons, the air inside heats up and becomes active. This solar energy is enough to take the balloons from the surface more than 20 km (66,000 ft) into the sky."  Scientists said their balloons could also help explore other planets. And they developed a theory to use these balloons to monitor the seismic and volcanic activity of Venus through its thick atmosphere.  "A new generation of Venus balloons is now being designed that can last for more than 100 days and can change its height to move through different layers of Venus' atmosphere," the team wrote.  As part of the next phase of experiments, they hope to catalog signals similar to those found on Venus, and develop tools that can automatically identify signals of interest.           The United States Defense Agency plans to launch hypersonic weapons tracking satellites  John Hill, Director of the US Missile Defense Agency, announced that in 2023 the United States will launch satellites to track hypersonic weapons.  These satellites will participate in flight tests and threat data collection throughout fiscal 2024.  And he says at a hearing in the US Senate Armed Services Committee: “The agency is working in cooperation with the space forces to create sensors for tracking hypersonic weapons and ballistic missiles in space (Hypersonic and Ballistic Tracking Space Sensor Satellite Set - HBTSS Note TASS). "These satellites will begin orbiting later this year to demonstrate their unique capabilities in tracking and targeting hypersonic launches. The HBTSS will also contribute to flight tests and real-time threat intelligence gathering throughout fiscal 2024."        From a group of astronomers resurrection within sight A danger threatening to swallow the earth!  After the discovery of the first black hole close to Earth on May 7, 2020, scientists and those interested began to wonder about the possibility of this danger swallowing the Earth and what might be the consequences of that.  On that first occasion, a group of astronomers from the European Southern Observatory and other institutes discovered a black hole called "HR 6819" just a thousand light-years from Earth.  This black hole is closer to the solar system than all others known today, and it is part of the triple star system visible to the naked eye.  Scientists have obtained the first image of a supermassive black hole in the center of the Milky Way. The mission required a telescope the size of the globe.  The seemingly impossible task was accomplished, thanks to the work of more than 300 specialists from 80 research centers, as astronomers connected 8 radio telescopes spread from Spain to Hawaii and from Arizona to Antarctica. The result was an image obtained with the help of radio waves.  In the image, a bright ring appears with a black spot in the middle. This ring consists of radiation that swirls around the black hole in a spiral.  In practice, radio waves, like light rays, should propagate in a straight line, but the black hole's massive gravity causes them to be bent by the force of the space around them.  Black holes, which were first discovered in 1916, are defined as space-time and space in which there is so much gravity that no nearby object, including light, can escape from it. The mass of black holes ranges between the equivalent of five suns or Dozens of suns, and several billion of the mass of the sun, so can a black hole absorb the Earth?  Specialized scientists tend to exclude such a possibility, pointing out that the chances of the Earth being exposed to a black hole before it is absorbed by the Sun are zero.  Astronomers believe that such a danger on Earth does not come even from the "closest" black holes, because the distance is too far, and these black holes will not affect our planet.  And Doug Goebel, a professor at the Department of Physics at the University of Rhode Island, USA, points out that "even if a black hole swallowed its twin star, its mass would not be sufficient for anything but a few flashes of radiation," stressing that the effect on Earth would be absolutely zero.  And the same expert goes on to clarify the issue by saying: “Although it will not be easy for a supermassive black hole or even a medium-mass black hole to appear somewhere near the solar system, it is quite possible not to notice a stellar-mass black hole when it approaches.” But even a large stellar-mass black hole, say 30 solar masses, would have to be closer to Neptune in order to have at least some gravitational effect on Earth, about the distance of Jupiter (a distance of about five times the Earth's distance from the Sun), to act on the Earth with a gravitational force approximately equal to that of the Sun."  As for hypothetically, if a black hole was suddenly exposed to the planet Earth, then when it approaches and is closer to the moon, the planet will be torn apart!  In this regard, Jonathan Zarak, a professor of physics and astronomy at Clemson University, USA, says: "The Earth will lose its atmosphere and oceans, and molten metal will flow from the Earth's crust into space."  This is unlikely to happen, as scientists suggest, even if the black hole gets too close, it will affect the Earth in some way, but it will not swallow it. The danger lies in the impact of the black hole on the orbit of the planet, and the climate may change or a collision with asteroids may occur.  Physicist Doug Goebel concludes that "the Earth will certainly survive, but it is unlikely that humanity and most of the multicellular species on Earth will survive."

Hot air balloons have recorded mysterious sounds of "completely unknown" origin high in Earth's atmosphere. 

Scientists, including Daniel Bowman of Sandia National Laboratories in the US, have sent large balloons 6-7 meters long into the stratosphere, the relatively quiet layer of the Earth's atmosphere located between 10 and 50 km above the Earth's surface that is rarely affected by aircraft or aircraft. unrest.

In this layer of Earth's outer atmosphere, science instruments on balloons can pick up a range of sounds not heard anywhere else, including the natural sounds of crashing ocean waves and thunder, as well as man-made sounds, such as wind turbines or explosions.

While balloons can detect such human and environmental sounds, the scientists reported that they were also able to record some strange sounds that could not be recognized.

They discovered a mysterious noise of unknown origin. According to the team, "ultrasonic" noise is inaudible to the human ear, like infrared light that is invisible to the human eye.

He revealed that when the sound was recorded with specialized tools and sped up several thousand times, it sounded like muffled whispers.

The scientists separated this mysterious noise from other sounds picked up from the area, such as the sound of ocean waves crashing into each other.

"In the stratosphere there are mysterious ultrasound signals that occur a few times an hour, but their origin is completely unknown," Dr. Bowman said in a statement.

The balloons, originally designed to monitor volcanoes on Earth, can collect data and detect low-frequency infrasound waves using micrometers.

Scientists have tracked these balloons using the Global Positioning System (GPS) so they can sometimes travel hundreds of miles and land in hard-to-reach places.

Dr Bowman explained: "When the sun shines on the dark balloons, the air inside heats up and becomes active. This solar energy is enough to take the balloons from the surface more than 20 km (66,000 ft) into the sky."

Scientists said their balloons could also help explore other planets. And they developed a theory to use these balloons to monitor the seismic and volcanic activity of Venus through its thick atmosphere.

"A new generation of Venus balloons is now being designed that can last for more than 100 days and can change its height to move through different layers of Venus' atmosphere," the team wrote.

As part of the next phase of experiments, they hope to catalog signals similar to those found on Venus, and develop tools that can automatically identify signals of interest.



The United States Defense Agency plans to launch hypersonic weapons tracking satellites

John Hill, Director of the US Missile Defense Agency, announced that in 2023 the United States will launch satellites to track hypersonic weapons.

These satellites will participate in flight tests and threat data collection throughout fiscal 2024.

And he says at a hearing in the US Senate Armed Services Committee: “The agency is working in cooperation with the space forces to create sensors for tracking hypersonic weapons and ballistic missiles in space (Hypersonic and Ballistic Tracking Space Sensor Satellite Set - HBTSS Note TASS). "These satellites will begin orbiting later this year to demonstrate their unique capabilities in tracking and targeting hypersonic launches. The HBTSS will also contribute to flight tests and real-time threat intelligence gathering throughout fiscal 2024."



From a group of astronomers resurrection within sight A danger threatening to swallow the earth!

After the discovery of the first black hole close to Earth on May 7, 2020, scientists and those interested began to wonder about the possibility of this danger swallowing the Earth and what might be the consequences of that.

On that first occasion, a group of astronomers from the European Southern Observatory and other institutes discovered a black hole called "HR 6819" just a thousand light-years from Earth.

This black hole is closer to the solar system than all others known today, and it is part of the triple star system visible to the naked eye.

Scientists have obtained the first image of a supermassive black hole in the center of the Milky Way. The mission required a telescope the size of the globe.

The Independent : The recording of mysterious sounds of "unknown" origin in the Earth's atmosphere baffles scientists  Hot air balloons have recorded mysterious sounds of "completely unknown" origin high in Earth's atmosphere.  Scientists, including Daniel Bowman of Sandia National Laboratories in the US, have sent large balloons 6-7 meters long into the stratosphere, the relatively quiet layer of the Earth's atmosphere located between 10 and 50 km above the Earth's surface that is rarely affected by aircraft or aircraft. unrest.  In this layer of Earth's outer atmosphere, science instruments on balloons can pick up a range of sounds not heard anywhere else, including the natural sounds of crashing ocean waves and thunder, as well as man-made sounds, such as wind turbines or explosions.  While balloons can detect such human and environmental sounds, the scientists reported that they were also able to record some strange sounds that could not be recognized.  They discovered a mysterious noise of unknown origin. According to the team, "ultrasonic" noise is inaudible to the human ear, like infrared light that is invisible to the human eye.  He revealed that when the sound was recorded with specialized tools and sped up several thousand times, it sounded like muffled whispers.  The scientists separated this mysterious noise from other sounds picked up from the area, such as the sound of ocean waves crashing into each other.  "In the stratosphere there are mysterious ultrasound signals that occur a few times an hour, but their origin is completely unknown," Dr. Bowman said in a statement.  The balloons, originally designed to monitor volcanoes on Earth, can collect data and detect low-frequency infrasound waves using micrometers.  Scientists have tracked these balloons using the Global Positioning System (GPS) so they can sometimes travel hundreds of miles and land in hard-to-reach places.  Dr Bowman explained: "When the sun shines on the dark balloons, the air inside heats up and becomes active. This solar energy is enough to take the balloons from the surface more than 20 km (66,000 ft) into the sky."  Scientists said their balloons could also help explore other planets. And they developed a theory to use these balloons to monitor the seismic and volcanic activity of Venus through its thick atmosphere.  "A new generation of Venus balloons is now being designed that can last for more than 100 days and can change its height to move through different layers of Venus' atmosphere," the team wrote.  As part of the next phase of experiments, they hope to catalog signals similar to those found on Venus, and develop tools that can automatically identify signals of interest.           The United States Defense Agency plans to launch hypersonic weapons tracking satellites  John Hill, Director of the US Missile Defense Agency, announced that in 2023 the United States will launch satellites to track hypersonic weapons.  These satellites will participate in flight tests and threat data collection throughout fiscal 2024.  And he says at a hearing in the US Senate Armed Services Committee: “The agency is working in cooperation with the space forces to create sensors for tracking hypersonic weapons and ballistic missiles in space (Hypersonic and Ballistic Tracking Space Sensor Satellite Set - HBTSS Note TASS). "These satellites will begin orbiting later this year to demonstrate their unique capabilities in tracking and targeting hypersonic launches. The HBTSS will also contribute to flight tests and real-time threat intelligence gathering throughout fiscal 2024."        From a group of astronomers resurrection within sight A danger threatening to swallow the earth!  After the discovery of the first black hole close to Earth on May 7, 2020, scientists and those interested began to wonder about the possibility of this danger swallowing the Earth and what might be the consequences of that.  On that first occasion, a group of astronomers from the European Southern Observatory and other institutes discovered a black hole called "HR 6819" just a thousand light-years from Earth.  This black hole is closer to the solar system than all others known today, and it is part of the triple star system visible to the naked eye.  Scientists have obtained the first image of a supermassive black hole in the center of the Milky Way. The mission required a telescope the size of the globe.  The seemingly impossible task was accomplished, thanks to the work of more than 300 specialists from 80 research centers, as astronomers connected 8 radio telescopes spread from Spain to Hawaii and from Arizona to Antarctica. The result was an image obtained with the help of radio waves.  In the image, a bright ring appears with a black spot in the middle. This ring consists of radiation that swirls around the black hole in a spiral.  In practice, radio waves, like light rays, should propagate in a straight line, but the black hole's massive gravity causes them to be bent by the force of the space around them.  Black holes, which were first discovered in 1916, are defined as space-time and space in which there is so much gravity that no nearby object, including light, can escape from it. The mass of black holes ranges between the equivalent of five suns or Dozens of suns, and several billion of the mass of the sun, so can a black hole absorb the Earth?  Specialized scientists tend to exclude such a possibility, pointing out that the chances of the Earth being exposed to a black hole before it is absorbed by the Sun are zero.  Astronomers believe that such a danger on Earth does not come even from the "closest" black holes, because the distance is too far, and these black holes will not affect our planet.  And Doug Goebel, a professor at the Department of Physics at the University of Rhode Island, USA, points out that "even if a black hole swallowed its twin star, its mass would not be sufficient for anything but a few flashes of radiation," stressing that the effect on Earth would be absolutely zero.  And the same expert goes on to clarify the issue by saying: “Although it will not be easy for a supermassive black hole or even a medium-mass black hole to appear somewhere near the solar system, it is quite possible not to notice a stellar-mass black hole when it approaches.” But even a large stellar-mass black hole, say 30 solar masses, would have to be closer to Neptune in order to have at least some gravitational effect on Earth, about the distance of Jupiter (a distance of about five times the Earth's distance from the Sun), to act on the Earth with a gravitational force approximately equal to that of the Sun."  As for hypothetically, if a black hole was suddenly exposed to the planet Earth, then when it approaches and is closer to the moon, the planet will be torn apart!  In this regard, Jonathan Zarak, a professor of physics and astronomy at Clemson University, USA, says: "The Earth will lose its atmosphere and oceans, and molten metal will flow from the Earth's crust into space."  This is unlikely to happen, as scientists suggest, even if the black hole gets too close, it will affect the Earth in some way, but it will not swallow it. The danger lies in the impact of the black hole on the orbit of the planet, and the climate may change or a collision with asteroids may occur.  Physicist Doug Goebel concludes that "the Earth will certainly survive, but it is unlikely that humanity and most of the multicellular species on Earth will survive."


The seemingly impossible task was accomplished, thanks to the work of more than 300 specialists from 80 research centers, as astronomers connected 8 radio telescopes spread from Spain to Hawaii and from Arizona to Antarctica. The result was an image obtained with the help of radio waves.

In the image, a bright ring appears with a black spot in the middle. This ring consists of radiation that swirls around the black hole in a spiral.

In practice, radio waves, like light rays, should propagate in a straight line, but the black hole's massive gravity causes them to be bent by the force of the space around them.

Black holes, which were first discovered in 1916, are defined as space-time and space in which there is so much gravity that no nearby object, including light, can escape from it. The mass of black holes ranges between the equivalent of five suns or Dozens of suns, and several billion of the mass of the sun, so can a black hole absorb the Earth?

Specialized scientists tend to exclude such a possibility, pointing out that the chances of the Earth being exposed to a black hole before it is absorbed by the Sun are zero.

Astronomers believe that such a danger on Earth does not come even from the "closest" black holes, because the distance is too far, and these black holes will not affect our planet.

And Doug Goebel, a professor at the Department of Physics at the University of Rhode Island, USA, points out that "even if a black hole swallowed its twin star, its mass would not be sufficient for anything but a few flashes of radiation," stressing that the effect on Earth would be absolutely zero.

The Independent : The recording of mysterious sounds of "unknown" origin in the Earth's atmosphere baffles scientists  Hot air balloons have recorded mysterious sounds of "completely unknown" origin high in Earth's atmosphere.  Scientists, including Daniel Bowman of Sandia National Laboratories in the US, have sent large balloons 6-7 meters long into the stratosphere, the relatively quiet layer of the Earth's atmosphere located between 10 and 50 km above the Earth's surface that is rarely affected by aircraft or aircraft. unrest.  In this layer of Earth's outer atmosphere, science instruments on balloons can pick up a range of sounds not heard anywhere else, including the natural sounds of crashing ocean waves and thunder, as well as man-made sounds, such as wind turbines or explosions.  While balloons can detect such human and environmental sounds, the scientists reported that they were also able to record some strange sounds that could not be recognized.  They discovered a mysterious noise of unknown origin. According to the team, "ultrasonic" noise is inaudible to the human ear, like infrared light that is invisible to the human eye.  He revealed that when the sound was recorded with specialized tools and sped up several thousand times, it sounded like muffled whispers.  The scientists separated this mysterious noise from other sounds picked up from the area, such as the sound of ocean waves crashing into each other.  "In the stratosphere there are mysterious ultrasound signals that occur a few times an hour, but their origin is completely unknown," Dr. Bowman said in a statement.  The balloons, originally designed to monitor volcanoes on Earth, can collect data and detect low-frequency infrasound waves using micrometers.  Scientists have tracked these balloons using the Global Positioning System (GPS) so they can sometimes travel hundreds of miles and land in hard-to-reach places.  Dr Bowman explained: "When the sun shines on the dark balloons, the air inside heats up and becomes active. This solar energy is enough to take the balloons from the surface more than 20 km (66,000 ft) into the sky."  Scientists said their balloons could also help explore other planets. And they developed a theory to use these balloons to monitor the seismic and volcanic activity of Venus through its thick atmosphere.  "A new generation of Venus balloons is now being designed that can last for more than 100 days and can change its height to move through different layers of Venus' atmosphere," the team wrote.  As part of the next phase of experiments, they hope to catalog signals similar to those found on Venus, and develop tools that can automatically identify signals of interest.           The United States Defense Agency plans to launch hypersonic weapons tracking satellites  John Hill, Director of the US Missile Defense Agency, announced that in 2023 the United States will launch satellites to track hypersonic weapons.  These satellites will participate in flight tests and threat data collection throughout fiscal 2024.  And he says at a hearing in the US Senate Armed Services Committee: “The agency is working in cooperation with the space forces to create sensors for tracking hypersonic weapons and ballistic missiles in space (Hypersonic and Ballistic Tracking Space Sensor Satellite Set - HBTSS Note TASS). "These satellites will begin orbiting later this year to demonstrate their unique capabilities in tracking and targeting hypersonic launches. The HBTSS will also contribute to flight tests and real-time threat intelligence gathering throughout fiscal 2024."        From a group of astronomers resurrection within sight A danger threatening to swallow the earth!  After the discovery of the first black hole close to Earth on May 7, 2020, scientists and those interested began to wonder about the possibility of this danger swallowing the Earth and what might be the consequences of that.  On that first occasion, a group of astronomers from the European Southern Observatory and other institutes discovered a black hole called "HR 6819" just a thousand light-years from Earth.  This black hole is closer to the solar system than all others known today, and it is part of the triple star system visible to the naked eye.  Scientists have obtained the first image of a supermassive black hole in the center of the Milky Way. The mission required a telescope the size of the globe.  The seemingly impossible task was accomplished, thanks to the work of more than 300 specialists from 80 research centers, as astronomers connected 8 radio telescopes spread from Spain to Hawaii and from Arizona to Antarctica. The result was an image obtained with the help of radio waves.  In the image, a bright ring appears with a black spot in the middle. This ring consists of radiation that swirls around the black hole in a spiral.  In practice, radio waves, like light rays, should propagate in a straight line, but the black hole's massive gravity causes them to be bent by the force of the space around them.  Black holes, which were first discovered in 1916, are defined as space-time and space in which there is so much gravity that no nearby object, including light, can escape from it. The mass of black holes ranges between the equivalent of five suns or Dozens of suns, and several billion of the mass of the sun, so can a black hole absorb the Earth?  Specialized scientists tend to exclude such a possibility, pointing out that the chances of the Earth being exposed to a black hole before it is absorbed by the Sun are zero.  Astronomers believe that such a danger on Earth does not come even from the "closest" black holes, because the distance is too far, and these black holes will not affect our planet.  And Doug Goebel, a professor at the Department of Physics at the University of Rhode Island, USA, points out that "even if a black hole swallowed its twin star, its mass would not be sufficient for anything but a few flashes of radiation," stressing that the effect on Earth would be absolutely zero.  And the same expert goes on to clarify the issue by saying: “Although it will not be easy for a supermassive black hole or even a medium-mass black hole to appear somewhere near the solar system, it is quite possible not to notice a stellar-mass black hole when it approaches.” But even a large stellar-mass black hole, say 30 solar masses, would have to be closer to Neptune in order to have at least some gravitational effect on Earth, about the distance of Jupiter (a distance of about five times the Earth's distance from the Sun), to act on the Earth with a gravitational force approximately equal to that of the Sun."  As for hypothetically, if a black hole was suddenly exposed to the planet Earth, then when it approaches and is closer to the moon, the planet will be torn apart!  In this regard, Jonathan Zarak, a professor of physics and astronomy at Clemson University, USA, says: "The Earth will lose its atmosphere and oceans, and molten metal will flow from the Earth's crust into space."  This is unlikely to happen, as scientists suggest, even if the black hole gets too close, it will affect the Earth in some way, but it will not swallow it. The danger lies in the impact of the black hole on the orbit of the planet, and the climate may change or a collision with asteroids may occur.  Physicist Doug Goebel concludes that "the Earth will certainly survive, but it is unlikely that humanity and most of the multicellular species on Earth will survive."


And the same expert goes on to clarify the issue by saying: “Although it will not be easy for a supermassive black hole or even a medium-mass black hole to appear somewhere near the solar system, it is quite possible not to notice a stellar-mass black hole when it approaches.” But even a large stellar-mass black hole, say 30 solar masses, would have to be closer to Neptune in order to have at least some gravitational effect on Earth, about the distance of Jupiter (a distance of about five times the Earth's distance from the Sun), to act on the Earth with a gravitational force approximately equal to that of the Sun."

As for hypothetically, if a black hole was suddenly exposed to the planet Earth, then when it approaches and is closer to the moon, the planet will be torn apart!

In this regard, Jonathan Zarak, a professor of physics and astronomy at Clemson University, USA, says: "The Earth will lose its atmosphere and oceans, and molten metal will flow from the Earth's crust into space."
The Independent : The recording of mysterious sounds of "unknown" origin in the Earth's atmosphere baffles scientists  Hot air balloons have recorded mysterious sounds of "completely unknown" origin high in Earth's atmosphere.  Scientists, including Daniel Bowman of Sandia National Laboratories in the US, have sent large balloons 6-7 meters long into the stratosphere, the relatively quiet layer of the Earth's atmosphere located between 10 and 50 km above the Earth's surface that is rarely affected by aircraft or aircraft. unrest.  In this layer of Earth's outer atmosphere, science instruments on balloons can pick up a range of sounds not heard anywhere else, including the natural sounds of crashing ocean waves and thunder, as well as man-made sounds, such as wind turbines or explosions.  While balloons can detect such human and environmental sounds, the scientists reported that they were also able to record some strange sounds that could not be recognized.  They discovered a mysterious noise of unknown origin. According to the team, "ultrasonic" noise is inaudible to the human ear, like infrared light that is invisible to the human eye.  He revealed that when the sound was recorded with specialized tools and sped up several thousand times, it sounded like muffled whispers.  The scientists separated this mysterious noise from other sounds picked up from the area, such as the sound of ocean waves crashing into each other.  "In the stratosphere there are mysterious ultrasound signals that occur a few times an hour, but their origin is completely unknown," Dr. Bowman said in a statement.  The balloons, originally designed to monitor volcanoes on Earth, can collect data and detect low-frequency infrasound waves using micrometers.  Scientists have tracked these balloons using the Global Positioning System (GPS) so they can sometimes travel hundreds of miles and land in hard-to-reach places.  Dr Bowman explained: "When the sun shines on the dark balloons, the air inside heats up and becomes active. This solar energy is enough to take the balloons from the surface more than 20 km (66,000 ft) into the sky."  Scientists said their balloons could also help explore other planets. And they developed a theory to use these balloons to monitor the seismic and volcanic activity of Venus through its thick atmosphere.  "A new generation of Venus balloons is now being designed that can last for more than 100 days and can change its height to move through different layers of Venus' atmosphere," the team wrote.  As part of the next phase of experiments, they hope to catalog signals similar to those found on Venus, and develop tools that can automatically identify signals of interest.           The United States Defense Agency plans to launch hypersonic weapons tracking satellites  John Hill, Director of the US Missile Defense Agency, announced that in 2023 the United States will launch satellites to track hypersonic weapons.  These satellites will participate in flight tests and threat data collection throughout fiscal 2024.  And he says at a hearing in the US Senate Armed Services Committee: “The agency is working in cooperation with the space forces to create sensors for tracking hypersonic weapons and ballistic missiles in space (Hypersonic and Ballistic Tracking Space Sensor Satellite Set - HBTSS Note TASS). "These satellites will begin orbiting later this year to demonstrate their unique capabilities in tracking and targeting hypersonic launches. The HBTSS will also contribute to flight tests and real-time threat intelligence gathering throughout fiscal 2024."        From a group of astronomers resurrection within sight A danger threatening to swallow the earth!  After the discovery of the first black hole close to Earth on May 7, 2020, scientists and those interested began to wonder about the possibility of this danger swallowing the Earth and what might be the consequences of that.  On that first occasion, a group of astronomers from the European Southern Observatory and other institutes discovered a black hole called "HR 6819" just a thousand light-years from Earth.  This black hole is closer to the solar system than all others known today, and it is part of the triple star system visible to the naked eye.  Scientists have obtained the first image of a supermassive black hole in the center of the Milky Way. The mission required a telescope the size of the globe.  The seemingly impossible task was accomplished, thanks to the work of more than 300 specialists from 80 research centers, as astronomers connected 8 radio telescopes spread from Spain to Hawaii and from Arizona to Antarctica. The result was an image obtained with the help of radio waves.  In the image, a bright ring appears with a black spot in the middle. This ring consists of radiation that swirls around the black hole in a spiral.  In practice, radio waves, like light rays, should propagate in a straight line, but the black hole's massive gravity causes them to be bent by the force of the space around them.  Black holes, which were first discovered in 1916, are defined as space-time and space in which there is so much gravity that no nearby object, including light, can escape from it. The mass of black holes ranges between the equivalent of five suns or Dozens of suns, and several billion of the mass of the sun, so can a black hole absorb the Earth?  Specialized scientists tend to exclude such a possibility, pointing out that the chances of the Earth being exposed to a black hole before it is absorbed by the Sun are zero.  Astronomers believe that such a danger on Earth does not come even from the "closest" black holes, because the distance is too far, and these black holes will not affect our planet.  And Doug Goebel, a professor at the Department of Physics at the University of Rhode Island, USA, points out that "even if a black hole swallowed its twin star, its mass would not be sufficient for anything but a few flashes of radiation," stressing that the effect on Earth would be absolutely zero.  And the same expert goes on to clarify the issue by saying: “Although it will not be easy for a supermassive black hole or even a medium-mass black hole to appear somewhere near the solar system, it is quite possible not to notice a stellar-mass black hole when it approaches.” But even a large stellar-mass black hole, say 30 solar masses, would have to be closer to Neptune in order to have at least some gravitational effect on Earth, about the distance of Jupiter (a distance of about five times the Earth's distance from the Sun), to act on the Earth with a gravitational force approximately equal to that of the Sun."  As for hypothetically, if a black hole was suddenly exposed to the planet Earth, then when it approaches and is closer to the moon, the planet will be torn apart!  In this regard, Jonathan Zarak, a professor of physics and astronomy at Clemson University, USA, says: "The Earth will lose its atmosphere and oceans, and molten metal will flow from the Earth's crust into space."  This is unlikely to happen, as scientists suggest, even if the black hole gets too close, it will affect the Earth in some way, but it will not swallow it. The danger lies in the impact of the black hole on the orbit of the planet, and the climate may change or a collision with asteroids may occur.  Physicist Doug Goebel concludes that "the Earth will certainly survive, but it is unlikely that humanity and most of the multicellular species on Earth will survive."


This is unlikely to happen, as scientists suggest, even if the black hole gets too close, it will affect the Earth in some way, but it will not swallow it. The danger lies in the impact of the black hole on the orbit of the planet, and the climate may change or a collision with asteroids may occur. 

Physicist Doug Goebel concludes that "the Earth will certainly survive, but it is unlikely that humanity and most of the multicellular species on Earth will survive."

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