Plastic in the arteries may threaten heart disease Plastic in the arteries may threaten heart disease

Plastic in the arteries may threaten heart disease

Plastic in the arteries may threaten heart disease

Italian researchers said on Wednesday that ultra-fine plastic particles found in fatty deposits lining human arteries may be linked to a higher risk of  heart disease , strokes and death.

Of 304 patients who underwent procedures to clean a major artery in the neck, 58% had microscopic and nanoscopic pieces of plastic with jagged edges in the plaque lining the blood vessels. Researcher Raffaele Marvella of the University of Campania in Naples and his colleagues explained that the materials included polyethylene and polyvinyl chloride, which contain chlorine.

The researchers found that those with nanoplastic particles in the plaque of their carotid artery (the artery that delivers blood to the brain and head) faced a 4.5 times higher risk of having a heart attack , stroke, or death over the next three years, after taking into account the individuals' other risk factors. .

The researchers said patients who had microscopic or nanoplastic particles in their plaque tissue also had high levels of inflammatory proteins in their blood, which are known to play a role in atherosclerosis and heart attacks.


drinking water
The researchers explained that polyethylene and polyvinyl chloride, in their various forms, have a wide range of uses, including the production of food packaging, cosmetics, and water pipes.

In the report published in the New England Journal of Medicine, researchers indicated that such microplastics have been found in drinking water, a wide range of foods and cosmetics, and even in the air.

Previous studies have discovered different types of microplastics and nanoplastics in multiple tissues, including the colon, liver, spleen, lymph node tissue, and placenta. Animal studies have shown that these plastics can cause toxic effects.

Although the new study could not prove that plastic caused negative effects on patients, it is the first study to link ultrafine particles to cardiovascular disease outcomes in humans.

3 Comments

  1. The research reveals concerning implications of ultrafine plastic particles in arterial plaque, potentially elevating risks of heart disease and strokes. Further investigation into plastic's impact on human health is imperative.





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  2. Previous studies have discovered different types of microplastics and nanoplastics in multiple tissues, including the colon, liver, spleen, lymph node tissue, and placenta. Animal studies have shown that these plastics can cause toxic effects.

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