Eric Zemmour promised to cancel it What do you know about the 1968 agreement between France and Algeria?

Eric Zemmour promised to cancel it What do you know about the 1968 agreement between France and Algeria?  The far-right candidate for the French presidency, Eric Zemmour, made another electoral promise that sparked controversy in French political circles, as he promised to cancel the 1968 agreement concluded with Algeria, which facilitates the presence of Algerians in France and gives them advantages that are not given to others. What are the terms of this agreement?  French presidential candidate Eric Zemmour is back in the spotlight with new controversial statements in the race for the election battle that France will accept next May.  This time, the extreme right-wing, which has become a symbol among right-wing circles in France, chose to attack Algeria and defend "colonialism", continuing its discourse in preparation for the election, in which it bets on the same-orientated voting blocs.  Zemmour strongly defended France's colonization of Algeria, but during his speech he made a sharp electoral promise, as he promised to cancel the French-Algerian agreement concluded in 1968, which facilitates the movement, work and residence of Algerians in France, in a new escalatory step.  Zemmour attacks Algeria During a meeting with journalists at the Association of Foreign Press (APE) in France on Monday, Eric Zemmour announced that he wanted to hold talks “among men” with Algerian leaders, ruling out at the same time any “apology” to Algeria for its colonial past, and stressed that it would be canceled if His election to the 1968 agreement that facilitates the work and residence of Algerian immigrants.  Zemmour, who is of Algerian descent, said, “It is our weakness that makes Algerian leaders arrogant, but they will respect people who respect themselves. They will understand what I will tell them, that there is no French guilt towards Algeria.”  The right-wing candidate continued: "We colonized Algeria for 130 years, but we were not the first or the only ones. Algeria has always been a land of colonization by the Romans, Arabs, Turks, Spaniards and others."  And Eric Zemmour added: "France left more things than all the other colonists," referring to "the roads and health institutes left by France and the oil discovered by France that feeds 40 million Algerians." He added, "There were massacres and clashes and I do not deny that at all, but they did not fight with roses, it is the history of the world."  The presidential candidate's statements come a few months before the 60th anniversary of the conclusion of the Evian Accords (18 March 1962), which paved the way for Algeria's independence.  Eric Zemmour added: "To the Algerian leaders, I say: We will talk between men, between responsible people," considering that the two countries have things to do together and common interests, such as financial insurance. However, he warned that "Algeria must stop considering France as the bank of its demographic surplus," saying that he was particularly determined to cancel a Franco-Algerian agreement concluded in 1968 that facilitates the movement, work and residence of Algerians in France.  Zemmour was not the first to target the Evian agreement. In the midst of the controversy over immigration and visas months ago, Republican Representative Eric Siotti, the candidate for the primaries for the right, asked at the time to cancel the residence permit system that benefits Algeria . And he called on Twitter to "go further and cancel the Evian agreements that give Algeria an exceptional immigration system."  What is the 1968 agreement? Considering that France was claiming that Algeria was not a colony but was administratively subordinate to it when it was occupied, the bilateral agreements between France and Algeria after independence were not yet subject to the logic of other agreements between countries, the most prominent example of which is the agreement of 27 December 1968.  After independence, the relationship between Paris and Algeria remained complex, especially with regard to the situation of Algerians in France, whose number had been large since the colonial period, and although France concluded agreements with all its historical colonies in this aspect, the agreement with Algeria was different, which made the Algerian citizen Treated with special treatment in France.  The agreement provides for facilitating the entry of Algerians into France on the condition of regular entry, as the French Ministry of the Interior explains on its website.  If Algerians wish to pursue a free profession or open a company, they will be able to benefit from the freedom of incorporation, and the issuance of a residence permit valid for 10 years is being accelerated if Algerian citizens request it, unlike other countries.  Concretely, Algerian citizens can, for example, request a 10-year residency certificate after 3 years of residency. versus 5 years under common law.  An Algerian married to a French woman is also granted a 10-year residency certificate after one year of marriage. If they wish to remain in France and are accepted there by family reunification. The family members of the Algerian husband obtain a residence permit for the same period of stay.

Eric Zemmour promised to cancel it What do you know about the 1968 agreement between France and Algeria?


The far-right candidate for the French presidency, Eric Zemmour, made another electoral promise that sparked controversy in French political circles, as he promised to cancel the 1968 agreement concluded with Algeria, which facilitates the presence of Algerians in France and gives them advantages that are not given to others. What are the terms of this agreement?

French presidential candidate Eric Zemmour is back in the spotlight with new controversial statements in the race for the election battle that France will accept next May.

This time, the extreme right-wing, which has become a symbol among right-wing circles in France, chose to attack Algeria and defend "colonialism", continuing its discourse in preparation for the election, in which it bets on the same-orientated voting blocs.

Zemmour strongly defended France's colonization of Algeria, but during his speech he made a sharp electoral promise, as he promised to cancel the French-Algerian agreement concluded in 1968, which facilitates the movement, work and residence of Algerians in France, in a new escalatory step.

Zemmour attacks Algeria
During a meeting with journalists at the Association of Foreign Press (APE) in France on Monday, Eric Zemmour announced that he wanted to hold talks “among men” with Algerian leaders, ruling out at the same time any “apology” to Algeria for its colonial past, and stressed that it would be canceled if His election to the 1968 agreement that facilitates the work and residence of Algerian immigrants.

Zemmour, who is of Algerian descent, said, “It is our weakness that makes Algerian leaders arrogant, but they will respect people who respect themselves. They will understand what I will tell them, that there is no French guilt towards Algeria.”

The right-wing candidate continued: "We colonized Algeria for 130 years, but we were not the first or the only ones. Algeria has always been a land of colonization by the Romans, Arabs, Turks, Spaniards and others."

And Eric Zemmour added: "France left more things than all the other colonists," referring to "the roads and health institutes left by France and the oil discovered by France that feeds 40 million Algerians." He added, "There were massacres and clashes and I do not deny that at all, but they did not fight with roses, it is the history of the world."

The presidential candidate's statements come a few months before the 60th anniversary of the conclusion of the Evian Accords (18 March 1962), which paved the way for Algeria's independence.

Eric Zemmour added: "To the Algerian leaders, I say: We will talk between men, between responsible people," considering that the two countries have things to do together and common interests, such as financial insurance. However, he warned that "Algeria must stop considering France as the bank of its demographic surplus," saying that he was particularly determined to cancel a Franco-Algerian agreement concluded in 1968 that facilitates the movement, work and residence of Algerians in France.

Zemmour was not the first to target the Evian agreement. In the midst of the controversy over immigration and visas months ago, Republican Representative Eric Siotti, the candidate for the primaries for the right, asked at the time to cancel the residence permit system that benefits Algeria . And he called on Twitter to "go further and cancel the Evian agreements that give Algeria an exceptional immigration system."

What is the 1968 agreement?
Considering that France was claiming that Algeria was not a colony but was administratively subordinate to it when it was occupied, the bilateral agreements between France and Algeria after independence were not yet subject to the logic of other agreements between countries, the most prominent example of which is the agreement of 27 December 1968.

After independence, the relationship between Paris and Algeria remained complex, especially with regard to the situation of Algerians in France, whose number had been large since the colonial period, and although France concluded agreements with all its historical colonies in this aspect, the agreement with Algeria was different, which made the Algerian citizen Treated with special treatment in France.

The agreement provides for facilitating the entry of Algerians into France on the condition of regular entry, as the French Ministry of the Interior explains on its website.

If Algerians wish to pursue a free profession or open a company, they will be able to benefit from the freedom of incorporation, and the issuance of a residence permit valid for 10 years is being accelerated if Algerian citizens request it, unlike other countries.

Concretely, Algerian citizens can, for example, request a 10-year residency certificate after 3 years of residency. versus 5 years under common law.

An Algerian married to a French woman is also granted a 10-year residency certificate after one year of marriage. If they wish to remain in France and are accepted there by family reunification. The family members of the Algerian husband obtain a residence permit for the same period of stay.


Refugee housing conditions in Britain Centers like prisons push them to think of committing suicide  The British authorities have long argued that they are committed to housing asylum seekers in good conditions, but recently there have been several reports by NGOs and NGOs that refute government statements and document difficult living conditions that lead refugees to contemplate suicide.  According to the latest statistics issued by the Office of National Statistics (ONS), there are currently about 65,000 asylum seekers in Britain, 41,000 of whom are in housing companies supervised by housing companies and about 19,000 in hotels. Government immigration officials expect the number to reach 80,000 by next spring.  In a survey prepared by the British Home Office in September 2021, it indicated that 40% of asylum seekers in Britain are unhappy and unsure of the housing in which they are placed. Despite the repeated complaints they made regarding cleanliness and the need for maintenance of the houses in which they were placed, the weak response of the authorities to their demands ended with no less than 5 cases of house collapses on the heads of their asylum-seekers.  While the British newspaper “The Independent” touched upon, in an exclusive report recently published, another serious topic, as the newspaper indicated that the British Home Office placed children and adults in one rooms and forced them to sleep together in hotels designated for immigrants, and did not transfer them to children’s centers until after the charities crossed She expressed her concern about the policy of the Boris Johnson government, which forces children who seek asylum to seriously consider suicide.  Circumstances that lead to suicide When asylum seekers come to Britain after crossing the Channel between the English and French coasts, unaccompanied children and adolescents are subjected to a rapid age assessment by social service workers appointed by the Home Office or by border officials, and if the child is mistakenly assessed as being over 18 They are converted into adult housing, which are usually adult hotels.  During this assessment process, many errors and circumstances occur with regard to children’s age predictions, as the “Carrefour Calais” association claimed that it had discovered 421 cases related to age estimation since 2020, describing them as being frightened and confused, which prompted a number of them to think of committing suicide and others fleeing before they intervened. Assembly and transfer the majority to nursing homes.  In a related context, the Independent's social affairs correspondent, May Pullman, pointed out that migrant children were forced to sleep in rooms and even beds with adults they did not know after placing large numbers of them in housing for adults over the age of 18.  While Maddie Harris of Human Rights Network said, "The Ministry of Interior puts children in adult hotels around the country and washed their hands completely from them, and they wait for them to contact an organization like ours, and for the local authorities to do something for them."  Prison-like centers In confirmation of the demands of many asylum seekers who described their reception centers as prisons, the organization “Asylum Matters” published at the end of last year a report in which it indicated that accommodation such as hostels, former army barracks and even hotels are unsuitable places for housing asylum seekers and caused severe psychological and physical damage to them.  The report described the lives of people in such places as living in prisons, and also pointed out that the greatest harm to living in institutional accommodations such as this is the lack of a sense of independence and the restriction of their abilities to live their own lives, through practices that impose restrictions on visitors, monitoring of residents’ movements and curfews.  Although these shelters are not official detention centers as is the case in Greece and some other European countries, its residents who communicate with human rights and charitable associations feel that they have been deprived of their basic freedom during their stay in such places, especially the old military barracks that have been converted into centers Reception of asylum seekers such as Napier in Kent and Benale in Wales.  Figures and facts Nearly 45,000 people sought asylum in the UK last year, while more than 25,000 people managed to cross from France to the UK by boat as of November 2021.  The Ministry of Interior figures also revealed a large backlog of asylum applications waiting to be heard, with nearly 68,000 cases pending so far. The increase in asylum applications is driven by arrivals from Eritrea, Iran and Syria, all of which have very high acceptance rates for asylum in the UK.  Figures from the Office for National Statistics (ONS) indicate a significant drop in net immigration to the UK in 2020, due to travel restrictions imposed by the Corona pandemic.  In addition to Corona, Britain’s exit from the European Union at the end of January 2020 was an important factor in the decrease in numbers by 88%, as net migration - the difference between people coming to live in the United Kingdom and leaving to other countries - reached 34,000 in 2020, compared to 271,000 in the previous year.

Refugee housing conditions in Britain Centers like prisons push them to think of committing suicide


The British authorities have long argued that they are committed to housing asylum seekers in good conditions, but recently there have been several reports by NGOs and NGOs that refute government statements and document difficult living conditions that lead refugees to contemplate suicide.

According to the latest statistics issued by the Office of National Statistics (ONS), there are currently about 65,000 asylum seekers in Britain, 41,000 of whom are in housing companies supervised by housing companies and about 19,000 in hotels. Government immigration officials expect the number to reach 80,000 by next spring.

In a survey prepared by the British Home Office in September 2021, it indicated that 40% of asylum seekers in Britain are unhappy and unsure of the housing in which they are placed. Despite the repeated complaints they made regarding cleanliness and the need for maintenance of the houses in which they were placed, the weak response of the authorities to their demands ended with no less than 5 cases of house collapses on the heads of their asylum-seekers.

While the British newspaper “The Independent” touched upon, in an exclusive report recently published, another serious topic, as the newspaper indicated that the British Home Office placed children and adults in one rooms and forced them to sleep together in hotels designated for immigrants, and did not transfer them to children’s centers until after the charities crossed She expressed her concern about the policy of the Boris Johnson government, which forces children who seek asylum to seriously consider suicide.

Circumstances that lead to suicide
When asylum seekers come to Britain after crossing the Channel between the English and French coasts, unaccompanied children and adolescents are subjected to a rapid age assessment by social service workers appointed by the Home Office or by border officials, and if the child is mistakenly assessed as being over 18 They are converted into adult housing, which are usually adult hotels.

During this assessment process, many errors and circumstances occur with regard to children’s age predictions, as the “Carrefour Calais” association claimed that it had discovered 421 cases related to age estimation since 2020, describing them as being frightened and confused, which prompted a number of them to think of committing suicide and others fleeing before they intervened. Assembly and transfer the majority to nursing homes.

In a related context, the Independent's social affairs correspondent, May Pullman, pointed out that migrant children were forced to sleep in rooms and even beds with adults they did not know after placing large numbers of them in housing for adults over the age of 18.

While Maddie Harris of Human Rights Network said, "The Ministry of Interior puts children in adult hotels around the country and washed their hands completely from them, and they wait for them to contact an organization like ours, and for the local authorities to do something for them."

Prison-like centers
In confirmation of the demands of many asylum seekers who described their reception centers as prisons, the organization “Asylum Matters” published at the end of last year a report in which it indicated that accommodation such as hostels, former army barracks and even hotels are unsuitable places for housing asylum seekers and caused severe psychological and physical damage to them.

The report described the lives of people in such places as living in prisons, and also pointed out that the greatest harm to living in institutional accommodations such as this is the lack of a sense of independence and the restriction of their abilities to live their own lives, through practices that impose restrictions on visitors, monitoring of residents’ movements and curfews.

Although these shelters are not official detention centers as is the case in Greece and some other European countries, its residents who communicate with human rights and charitable associations feel that they have been deprived of their basic freedom during their stay in such places, especially the old military barracks that have been converted into centers Reception of asylum seekers such as Napier in Kent and Benale in Wales.

Figures and facts
Nearly 45,000 people sought asylum in the UK last year, while more than 25,000 people managed to cross from France to the UK by boat as of November 2021.

The Ministry of Interior figures also revealed a large backlog of asylum applications waiting to be heard, with nearly 68,000 cases pending so far. The increase in asylum applications is driven by arrivals from Eritrea, Iran and Syria, all of which have very high acceptance rates for asylum in the UK.

Figures from the Office for National Statistics (ONS) indicate a significant drop in net immigration to the UK in 2020, due to travel restrictions imposed by the Corona pandemic.

In addition to Corona, Britain’s exit from the European Union at the end of January 2020 was an important factor in the decrease in numbers by 88%, as net migration - the difference between people coming to live in the United Kingdom and leaving to other countries - reached 34,000 in 2020, compared to 271,000 in the previous year.


Today, Germany witnesses the second trial of torture in Syria  Germany will witness the trial on Wednesday of a Syrian doctor suspected of crimes against humanity, including torturing prisoners in military hospitals in Syria, in the second case of its kind related to allegations of regime-backed torture in the Syrian conflict.  After a major German court sentenced a former Syrian intelligence officer to life imprisonment last week for crimes against humanity , the trial of the 36-year-old doctor will begin at the Higher Regional Court in Frankfurt am Main.  The accused, known only by the name Alaa M. Under German privacy laws, accusations of torturing opponents of the Syrian regime president, Bashar al-Assad, while working as a doctor in a military prison and hospitals in Homs and Damascus in 2011 and 2012.  The Assad government denies accusations of torturing prisoners.  Alaa M. has arrived. He moved to Germany in 2015 to work as a doctor until he was arrested in June 2020. He has since been in pre-trial detention.  German prosecutors use universal jurisdiction laws that allow them to seek prosecutions of suspected perpetrators of crimes against humanity anywhere in the world.  Prosecutors accused Alaa M. In 18 cases of torture, they say he killed one of the prisoners. In one case, the defendant is accused of performing corrective surgery for a bone fracture without adequate anaesthesia.  He is also accused of trying to deprive prisoners of their reproductive ability in two cases.  Other methods of torture that prosecutors say he used against detained civilians include dousing a teenager's genitals with alcohol in a Homs military hospital and setting them on fire with a lighter.  The doctor also worked at the 601 Military Hospital in Mezzeh in Damascus, whose morgue and courtyard, according to Human Rights Watch, were seen in a series of photographs depicting the extent of state torture against civilians and smuggled abroad by a government photographer known as Caesar.  Antonia Klein, legal advisor at the European Center for Constitutional and Human Rights, which supports the prosecution in the case, said sexual violence as a crime against humanity would play an important role in the trial.  "The trial also shows how diverse the crimes (in the Syrian conflict) and how large they will continue to occur," Klein said.  Syrian lawyer Anwar al-Bunni, who heads a Berlin-based rights group that helped bring the case against Alaa M., said the trial would yield more evidence that the Syrian regime incited torture to quell the uprising against Assad.  “We hope that he will be sentenced to life imprisonment,” al-Bunni said, adding that he expected the court to reach a verdict by the end of this year.

Today, Germany witnesses the second trial of torture in Syria


Germany will witness the trial on Wednesday of a Syrian doctor suspected of crimes against humanity, including torturing prisoners in military hospitals in Syria, in the second case of its kind related to allegations of regime-backed torture in the Syrian conflict.

After a major German court sentenced a former Syrian intelligence officer to life imprisonment last week for crimes against humanity , the trial of the 36-year-old doctor will begin at the Higher Regional Court in Frankfurt am Main.

The accused, known only by the name Alaa M. Under German privacy laws, accusations of torturing opponents of the Syrian regime president, Bashar al-Assad, while working as a doctor in a military prison and hospitals in Homs and Damascus in 2011 and 2012.

The Assad government denies accusations of torturing prisoners.

Alaa M. has arrived. He moved to Germany in 2015 to work as a doctor until he was arrested in June 2020. He has since been in pre-trial detention.

German prosecutors use universal jurisdiction laws that allow them to seek prosecutions of suspected perpetrators of crimes against humanity anywhere in the world.

Prosecutors accused Alaa M. In 18 cases of torture, they say he killed one of the prisoners. In one case, the defendant is accused of performing corrective surgery for a bone fracture without adequate anaesthesia.

He is also accused of trying to deprive prisoners of their reproductive ability in two cases.

Other methods of torture that prosecutors say he used against detained civilians include dousing a teenager's genitals with alcohol in a Homs military hospital and setting them on fire with a lighter.

The doctor also worked at the 601 Military Hospital in Mezzeh in Damascus, whose morgue and courtyard, according to Human Rights Watch, were seen in a series of photographs depicting the extent of state torture against civilians and smuggled abroad by a government photographer known as Caesar.

Antonia Klein, legal advisor at the European Center for Constitutional and Human Rights, which supports the prosecution in the case, said sexual violence as a crime against humanity would play an important role in the trial.

"The trial also shows how diverse the crimes (in the Syrian conflict) and how large they will continue to occur," Klein said.

Syrian lawyer Anwar al-Bunni, who heads a Berlin-based rights group that helped bring the case against Alaa M., said the trial would yield more evidence that the Syrian regime incited torture to quell the uprising against Assad.

“We hope that he will be sentenced to life imprisonment,” al-Bunni said, adding that he expected the court to reach a verdict by the end of this year.
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