A debate between two governments Bashagha sworn in in Libya and Dabaiba insists not to step down

A debate between two governments Bashagha sworn in in Libya and Dabaiba insists not to step down  Fathi Bashagha was sworn in as the new prime minister in Tobruk in front of the Libyan parliament, while the outgoing prime minister, Abdel Hamid Dabaiba, announced that he would not step down, amid accusations of obstructing the travel of ministers from the new government.  Fathi Bashagha was sworn in as Libya's new prime minister in front of the Libyan parliament in Tobruk on Thursday. And Bashagha did so despite the announcement by the outgoing Prime Minister, Abdel Hamid Dabaiba, that he would not step down.  During the session, one of the new ministers in the new government announced his withdrawal from it, claiming that the confidence-giving session was not impartial.  Economy Minister Jamal Shaaban said that he "absolutely rejects the position in solidarity with the Libyan people," stressing that he is not honored by his presence in a government that "brings war and destruction, and introduces the capital into a dark tunnel."  This comes at a time of growing fears of a resurgence of fighting and the division of spheres of influence, as the new government accused the Dabaiba government of kidnapping two of the new ministers.  Earlier on Thursday, two sources close to the new Libyan Prime Minister, Bashagha, said that an armed force linked to Dabaiba in the coastal town of Misurata had detained the two candidates for the posts of Foreign Minister and Minister of Culture in the new government, as they tried to travel by road from Tripoli to Tobruk, according to Reuters.  A spokesman for the Dabaiba government did not respond to a request for comment on the accusation so far. A year ago, the Libyan Political Dialogue Forum appointed Dabaiba to head a transitional government whose mission is to unify institutions and lead the country to presidential and legislative elections, the date of which was set for last December 24.  But the deep differences led to the postponement of these elections indefinitely, and the international community was pinning great hopes on them to contribute to the stability of a country torn apart and still in chaos for 11 years.  Armed groups affiliated with opposition factions have mobilized in the capital in recent weeks, amid fears that the country's political crisis will descend into violence, division and chaos, after a year and a half of relative calm.  There are currently two prime ministers in power, while the United Nations last night raised doubts about the correctness of the step taken by Parliament to install a new prime minister, saying it was concerned by reports that this measure did not live up to expected standards.

Fathi Bashagha was sworn in as the new prime minister in Tobruk in front of the Libyan parliament. 

while the outgoing prime minister, Abdel Hamid Dabaiba, announced that he would not step down, amid accusations of obstructing the travel of ministers from the new government.

Fathi Bashagha was sworn in as Libya's new prime minister in front of the Libyan parliament in Tobruk on Thursday.
And Bashagha did so despite the announcement by the outgoing Prime Minister, Abdel Hamid Dabaiba, that he would not step down.

During the session, one of the new ministers in the new government announced his withdrawal from it, claiming that the confidence-giving session was not impartial.

Economy Minister Jamal Shaaban said that he "absolutely rejects the position in solidarity with the Libyan people," stressing that he is not honored by his presence in a government that "brings war and destruction, and introduces the capital into a dark tunnel."

This comes at a time of growing fears of a resurgence of fighting and the division of spheres of influence, as the new government accused the Dabaiba government of kidnapping two of the new ministers.

Earlier on Thursday, two sources close to the new Libyan Prime Minister, Bashagha, said that an armed force linked to Dabaiba in the coastal town of Misurata had detained the two candidates for the posts of Foreign Minister and Minister of Culture in the new government, as they tried to travel by road from Tripoli to Tobruk, according to Reuters.

A spokesman for the Dabaiba government did not respond to a request for comment on the accusation so far.
A year ago, the Libyan Political Dialogue Forum appointed Dabaiba to head a transitional government whose mission is to unify institutions and lead the country to presidential and legislative elections, the date of which was set for last December 24.

But the deep differences led to the postponement of these elections indefinitely, and the international community was pinning great hopes on them to contribute to the stability of a country torn apart and still in chaos for 11 years.

Armed groups affiliated with opposition factions have mobilized in the capital in recent weeks, amid fears that the country's political crisis will descend into violence, division and chaos, after a year and a half of relative calm.

There are currently two prime ministers in power, while the United Nations last night raised doubts about the correctness of the step taken by Parliament to install a new prime minister, saying it was concerned by reports that this measure did not live up to expected standards.

Cameroon: 7 people, including 1 sub-prefect, killed in the English-speaking area  On March 4, 2012, explosions in an arms and ammunition depot in the Mpila district caused thousands of victims. Ten years later, most of the 17,000 victims are still homeless.  Pending decent housing, many Congolese in this district of Brazzaville, the capital, have erected precarious shelters where they can.  Today the sheet metal sheds act as homes while waiting for the buildings blown up by the explosions to be rehabilitated.  In recent months, residents of the neighborhood have defied the police and demonstrated to demand reparations while protesting the silence of the authorities.  At least 282 people died in the explosions of the Mpila military barracks and more than 2,300 were injured, including 114 invalids, more than 25,000 displaced, including 17,000 homeless.  In September 2013, six soldiers were sentenced for "arson and undermining the internal security of the State". these NGOs would have liked a trial of the State, which they accuse of having let the populations settle around a barracks containing dangerous weapons  After the explosions, the State offered homeless victims to settle temporarily on a site of 1,000 housing units built in Kintélé, 25 km north of Brazzaville). In 2021, the State paid a deposit of one billion FCFA to a thousand victims and intends to pay another deposit of six billion in 2022.

Cameroon: 7 people, including 1 sub-prefect, killed in the English-speaking area


On March 4, 2012, explosions in an arms and ammunition depot in the Mpila district caused thousands of victims. Ten years later, most of the 17,000 victims are still homeless.

Pending decent housing, many Congolese in this district of Brazzaville, the capital, have erected precarious shelters where they can.

Today the sheet metal sheds act as homes while waiting for the buildings blown up by the explosions to be rehabilitated.

In recent months, residents of the neighborhood have defied the police and demonstrated to demand reparations while protesting the silence of the authorities.

At least 282 people died in the explosions of the Mpila military barracks and more than 2,300 were injured, including 114 invalids, more than 25,000 displaced, including 17,000 homeless.

In September 2013, six soldiers were sentenced for "arson and undermining the internal security of the State".
these NGOs would have liked a trial of the State, which they accuse of having let the populations settle around a barracks containing dangerous weapons

After the explosions, the State offered homeless victims to settle temporarily on a site of 1,000 housing units built in Kintélé, 25 km north of Brazzaville). In 2021, the State paid a deposit of one billion FCFA to a thousand victims and intends to pay another deposit of six billion in 2022.

Burkina: demonstrators demand the withdrawal of the Bolloré group  A demonstration was organized in Ouagadougou in Burkina Faso to demand the cancellation of the management of the Abidjan-Kaya-Tambao railway by the Bolloré group.  After the Burkina 2050 consortium denounced the shortcomings of the framework agreement signed between Burkina Faso, Côte d'Ivoire and the Bolloré group , the Burkinabés responded to its call to demonstrate.  _"We don't agree. We want Bolloré to leave, he just has to leave. We're going to manage our train, we're going to manage our rail. And he just has to fix the rails before All the money he took there, he just has to fix the tracks before he leaves. We're tired, we're tired. We're tired, we're tired, we're tired." said _Natalie Sawadogo, a protester.  "Because for 27 years he was from Burkina Faso, he put in money. He fixed the rails, he put everything back in operation so that he could take over the management and he had to work and repay, he did not repay. He promised to invest 262 billion and dust to refurbish the railway. He hasn't done it. It's been three years since he was supposed to start, now he doesn't want to do it anymore, he wants to sell the railway. do, management to someone else. That's cheating, I think that's bullshit even." added Nestorine Sangaré, organizer of the event.  On the occasion of the 9th summit of the Treaty of Friendship and Cooperation between Burkina and Côte d'Ivoire in July 2021, a deadline until September to start the work was given to SITARAIL, a subsidiary of the Bolloré group. . To date, this deadline has still not been respected.  "We are asking the Burkinabè government to break the contract and to sue because it has exploited, it has completely destroyed the rails, the wagons, the premises, all the infrastructure has been destroyed. We want the Burkinabè state to commit proceedings against Bolloré and the other national shareholders." explained Nestorine Sangaré, organizer of the event.  A petition has been created to cancel the revised concession agreement concluded between SITARAIL and the Burkinabé State.

Burkina: demonstrators demand the withdrawal of the Bolloré group


A demonstration was organized in Ouagadougou in Burkina Faso to demand the cancellation of the management of the Abidjan-Kaya-Tambao railway by the Bolloré group.

After the Burkina 2050 consortium denounced the shortcomings of the framework agreement signed between Burkina Faso, Côte d'Ivoire and the Bolloré group , the Burkinabés responded to its call to demonstrate.

_"We don't agree. We want Bolloré to leave, he just has to leave. We're going to manage our train, we're going to manage our rail. And he just has to fix the rails before All the money he took there, he just has to fix the tracks before he leaves. We're tired, we're tired. We're tired, we're tired, we're tired." said _Natalie Sawadogo, a protester.

"Because for 27 years he was from Burkina Faso, he put in money. He fixed the rails, he put everything back in operation so that he could take over the management and he had to work and repay, he did not repay. He promised to invest 262 billion and dust to refurbish the railway. He hasn't done it. It's been three years since he was supposed to start, now he doesn't want to do it anymore, he wants to sell the railway. do, management to someone else. That's cheating, I think that's bullshit even." added Nestorine Sangaré, organizer of the event.

On the occasion of the 9th summit of the Treaty of Friendship and Cooperation between Burkina and Côte d'Ivoire in July 2021, a deadline until September to start the work was given to SITARAIL, a subsidiary of the Bolloré group. . To date, this deadline has still not been respected.

"We are asking the Burkinabè government to break the contract and to sue because it has exploited, it has completely destroyed the rails, the wagons, the premises, all the infrastructure has been destroyed. We want the Burkinabè state to commit proceedings against Bolloré and the other national shareholders." explained Nestorine Sangaré, organizer of the event.

A petition has been created to cancel the revised concession agreement concluded between SITARAIL and the Burkinabé State.
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