Kenya: Former President Mwai Kibaki has died

Kenya: Former President Mwai Kibaki has died  Former Kenyan President Mwai Kibaki died at the age of 90 on Friday. Involved in politics since independence in 1963, the former professor of economics trained in Uganda and London, was elected in 2002. After leaving power in 2013, Mwai Kibaki took refuge in his stronghold of Nyeri , about a hundred kilometers north of Nairobi  As a leading figure in Kenya's post-independence history, Mwai Kibaki has won the abiding respect and affection of the people of this nation and other nations around the world. President Kibaki will forever be remembered as the gentleman of Kenyan politics, a brilliant debater, whose eloquence, wit and charm won out over and over again, President Uhuru Kenyatta said.  Under his presidency from 2002 to 2013, Kenya confirmed its role as an economic engine in East Africa and diversified its external partnerships. Among his legacy is also better education and health care for Kenyans.  MP for some five decades - Mwai Kibaki was first elected as an MP in 1963 and will go down as one of the drafting staff of the current Kenyan Constitution.       Floods in South Africa: "We are suffering"  The Durban region in South Africa still bears the scars of the storm that devastated the east coast of the country in mid-April. Cleaning punctuates the days, between fatigue, weariness and the desire to move forward despite everything.  Sitting on the side of a road under a blazing sun, South Africans in the suburbs of Durban have been waiting for hours for a delivery of drinking water: the tenth day without water since the deadly floods.  At least 435 people have been killed and thousands are homeless after heavy rains that lasted a week. Most of the casualties were in the port city area of ​​3.9 million people in KwaZulu-Natal .  Floods and landslides have destroyed roads, bridges and pipelines. “ We won't survive without water ,” says Spha Dumasani , 35, who waits, sitting on a desperately empty bucket at the top of this hill.  The tankers sent by the authorities have not arrived so far at Mariannhill . A vehicle passed well, empty. The driver promised to refuel and come back. It was four hours ago. Since then, still nothing.  The South African army has announced that it has so far deployed 400 soldiers out of a total of 10,000 planned for relief operations. Air support has been reinforced, in particular to transport goods. But some areas remain inaccessible.  Spha Dumasani recounts surviving the past few days by collecting water from a broken pipe further down. “ We are suffering ,” he admits. " We need water to wash ourselves, to cook ".  Exceptional funds for disaster relief have been pledged. President Cyril Ramaphosa has declared a state of national disaster.  Cholera The state-owned company, Umgeni Water , said on Wednesday that two of the four main aqueducts that carry water to the treatment plant supplying the city are damaged. Repairs are still in progress.  If part of the clean water supply has been restored, tens of thousands of liters are still missing per day to serve the entire population.  NGOs have mobilized and continue to distribute bottles of water and food, as well as blankets and mattresses.  Nearly 4,000 houses were destroyed, more than 13,500 damaged. Dozens of people are still missing, helicopters continue to fly over the city.  Authorities expect hundreds of millions of euros in damages.  “ Several people have diarrhoea. We don't know what caused it, but it appeared just after the water cut ,” says Mthobisi Myaka , 23. His brother is sick.  He explains that he boiled the water he had collected, with coal and wood collected from the debris of the unprecedented storm that hit the country. But he's not sure that's enough.  Health authorities have warned of diseases like cholera, carried by drinking dirty water.  " We are concerned that in a short time we will see an upsurge in cases of waterborne diseases because people are getting their water from unreliable sources ," Dr Mvuyisi Mzukwa , chairman of the South African Medical Association.  “ This water can be contaminated, which can lead to cases of enteric illnesses where people develop diarrhoea ,” he continues.  The extent of the damage to the network is still being established. Work should start only by Sunday.

Former Kenyan President Mwai Kibaki died at the age of 90 on Friday. Involved in politics since independence in 1963, the former professor of economics trained in Uganda and London, was elected in 2002. After leaving power in 2013, Mwai Kibaki took refuge in his stronghold of Nyeri , about a hundred kilometers north of Nairobi

As a leading figure in Kenya's post-independence history, Mwai Kibaki has won the abiding respect and affection of the people of this nation and other nations around the world. President Kibaki will forever be remembered as the gentleman of Kenyan politics, a brilliant debater, whose eloquence, wit and charm won out over and over again, President Uhuru Kenyatta said.

Under his presidency from 2002 to 2013, Kenya confirmed its role as an economic engine in East Africa and diversified its external partnerships. Among his legacy is also better education and health care for Kenyans.

MP for some five decades - Mwai Kibaki was first elected as an MP in 1963 and will go down as one of the drafting staff of the current Kenyan Constitution.

Floods in South Africa: "We are suffering"

The Durban region in South Africa still bears the scars of the storm that devastated the east coast of the country in mid-April. Cleaning punctuates the days, between fatigue, weariness and the desire to move forward despite everything.

Sitting on the side of a road under a blazing sun, South Africans in the suburbs of Durban have been waiting for hours for a delivery of drinking water: the tenth day without water since the deadly floods.

At least 435 people have been killed and thousands are homeless after heavy rains that lasted a week. Most of the casualties were in the port city area of ​​3.9 million people in KwaZulu-Natal .

Floods and landslides have destroyed roads, bridges and pipelines. “ We won't survive without water ,” says Spha Dumasani , 35, who waits, sitting on a desperately empty bucket at the top of this hill.

The tankers sent by the authorities have not arrived so far at Mariannhill . A vehicle passed well, empty. The driver promised to refuel and come back. It was four hours ago. Since then, still nothing.

The South African army has announced that it has so far deployed 400 soldiers out of a total of 10,000 planned for relief operations. Air support has been reinforced, in particular to transport goods. But some areas remain inaccessible.

Spha Dumasani recounts surviving the past few days by collecting water from a broken pipe further down. “ We are suffering ,” he admits. " We need water to wash ourselves, to cook ".

Exceptional funds for disaster relief have been pledged. President Cyril Ramaphosa has declared a state of national disaster.

Cholera
The state-owned company, Umgeni Water , said on Wednesday that two of the four main aqueducts that carry water to the treatment plant supplying the city are damaged. Repairs are still in progress.

If part of the clean water supply has been restored, tens of thousands of liters are still missing per day to serve the entire population.

NGOs have mobilized and continue to distribute bottles of water and food, as well as blankets and mattresses.

Nearly 4,000 houses were destroyed, more than 13,500 damaged. Dozens of people are still missing, helicopters continue to fly over the city.

Authorities expect hundreds of millions of euros in damages.

“ Several people have diarrhoea. We don't know what caused it, but it appeared just after the water cut ,” says Mthobisi Myaka , 23. His brother is sick.

He explains that he boiled the water he had collected, with coal and wood collected from the debris of the unprecedented storm that hit the country. But he's not sure that's enough.

Health authorities have warned of diseases like cholera, carried by drinking dirty water.

" We are concerned that in a short time we will see an upsurge in cases of waterborne diseases because people are getting their water from unreliable sources ," Dr Mvuyisi Mzukwa , chairman of the South African Medical Association.

“ This water can be contaminated, which can lead to cases of enteric illnesses where people develop diarrhoea ,” he continues.

The extent of the damage to the network is still being established. Work should start only by Sunday.
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