"No shelter, no relatives" Survivors suffer the bitterness of the earthquake in the town of Jandris in Syria "No shelter, no relatives" Survivors suffer the bitterness of the earthquake in the town of Jandris in Syria

"No shelter, no relatives" Survivors suffer the bitterness of the earthquake in the town of Jandris in Syria

"No shelter, no relatives" Survivors suffer the bitterness of the earthquake in the town of Jandris in Syria Survivors of the earthquake in the town of Jenderes, Syria, began to feel the pain of losing their families and relatives who suffered under the rubble as a result of the earthquake. According to the Syrian Civil Defense (White Helmets), "more than 500 people were killed in the town of Jenderes alone, and hundreds of homes were destroyed by the earthquake."  The survivors of the earthquake in the town of Jenderes, northwestern Syria, began to feel the pain of losing their families and relatives who died under the rubble as a result of the devastating earthquake.  The earthquake caused great damage in the Syrian areas under the control of the opposition, where the town of Jenderes in the city of Afrin received the largest share of casualties and destruction.  At dawn on February 6, a double earthquake struck southern Turkey and northern Syria, the first measuring 7.7 degrees and the second 7.6 degrees, with hundreds of violent aftershocks, which left huge losses of lives and property in both countries.  According to the Syrian Civil Defense (White Helmets), "more than 500 people were killed in the town of Jenderes alone, while hundreds of homes were destroyed by the earthquake in the town."  Anatolia met with a number of those who lost their relatives as a result of the earthquake in Jenderes, who are in a state of shock and pain over what happened.  Ahmed Labbi, who was displaced from Homs and lives in Jenderes, said that he lost his father, mother, brother, wife, 4 of his nephews, and 39 of his relatives and acquaintances.  Labbi indicated that they were unable to save the victims and that they pulled them out from under the rubble 24 hours after the earthquake and found them dead.  For his part, Ahmed Othman, whose two-year-old daughter lost her life under the rubble, spoke of the moments of the earthquake with great sadness.  He said: "When the earthquake occurred, the building in which we were living fell, so my brothers came and pulled us out from under the rubble, and my daughter had lost her life."  He added, "I was awake when the earthquake occurred, and when I felt it, I woke up the family members and we ran towards the door, but the building fell on us before we left."  Bader Mustafa, who was displaced from the southern countryside of Idlib, to escape the bombing of the Syrian regime, lost his 16-year-old son in the earthquake, and the father remained homeless.  The bereaved father explained that his son died under the rubble of the house while trying to rescue the neighbours' children.  He continued, "We did not take anything from the house, all our belongings remained under the rubble, and now we live in the street, and we have no place to shelter us, and we have no relatives to turn to."  Father Abdul Rahman Khalaf buried 3 of his sons who died in the earthquake and is now homeless.  Khalaf said, "We have lost everything and have been living on the street for days, and we cannot find a place to stay. We are in a deplorable situation."  In turn, the child Jean Said lost 11 members of his family, including his aunt, cousin and grandfather.  Saeed explained that after the earthquake, their aunt's house collapsed and her injured daughter was taken to the hospital. On the second day of the earthquake, rescue teams recovered the bodies of his aunt and her son.  Muhammad Zain (13 years old) also lost 7 of his relatives in the earthquake, according to what he says.  As for Fatima Hassan, whose house collapsed, she said that she is raising two orphan children, and that the neighbors rescued her and the two children from the rubble, but now she lives in a tent.  The death toll from the earthquake in all regions of Syria reached 3,688 dead, and 14,749 injured, more than half of whom were in opposition-held areas.

Survivors of the earthquake in the town of Jenderes, Syria, began to feel the pain of losing their families and relatives who suffered under the rubble as a result of the earthquake. According to the Syrian Civil Defense (White Helmets), "more than 500 people were killed in the town of Jenderes alone, and hundreds of homes were destroyed by the earthquake."

The survivors of the earthquake in the town of Jenderes, northwestern Syria, began to feel the pain of losing their families and relatives who died under the rubble as a result of the devastating earthquake.

The earthquake caused great damage in the Syrian areas under the control of the opposition, where the town of Jenderes in the city of Afrin received the largest share of casualties and destruction.

At dawn on February 6, a double earthquake struck southern Turkey and northern Syria, the first measuring 7.7 degrees and the second 7.6 degrees, with hundreds of violent aftershocks, which left huge losses of lives and property in both countries.

According to the Syrian Civil Defense (White Helmets), "more than 500 people were killed in the town of Jenderes alone, while hundreds of homes were destroyed by the earthquake in the town."

Anatolia met with a number of those who lost their relatives as a result of the earthquake in Jenderes, who are in a state of shock and pain over what happened.

Ahmed Labbi, who was displaced from Homs and lives in Jenderes, said that he lost his father, mother, brother, wife, 4 of his nephews, and 39 of his relatives and acquaintances.

Labbi indicated that they were unable to save the victims and that they pulled them out from under the rubble 24 hours after the earthquake and found them dead.

For his part, Ahmed Othman, whose two-year-old daughter lost her life under the rubble, spoke of the moments of the earthquake with great sadness.

He said: "When the earthquake occurred, the building in which we were living fell, so my brothers came and pulled us out from under the rubble, and my daughter had lost her life."

He added, "I was awake when the earthquake occurred, and when I felt it, I woke up the family members and we ran towards the door, but the building fell on us before we left."

Bader Mustafa, who was displaced from the southern countryside of Idlib, to escape the bombing of the Syrian regime, lost his 16-year-old son in the earthquake, and the father remained homeless.

The bereaved father explained that his son died under the rubble of the house while trying to rescue the neighbours' children.

He continued, "We did not take anything from the house, all our belongings remained under the rubble, and now we live in the street, and we have no place to shelter us, and we have no relatives to turn to."

Father Abdul Rahman Khalaf buried 3 of his sons who died in the earthquake and is now homeless.

Khalaf said, "We have lost everything and have been living on the street for days, and we cannot find a place to stay. We are in a deplorable situation."

In turn, the child Jean Said lost 11 members of his family, including his aunt, cousin and grandfather.

Saeed explained that after the earthquake, their aunt's house collapsed and her injured daughter was taken to the hospital. On the second day of the earthquake, rescue teams recovered the bodies of his aunt and her son.

Muhammad Zain (13 years old) also lost 7 of his relatives in the earthquake, according to what he says.

As for Fatima Hassan, whose house collapsed, she said that she is raising two orphan children, and that the neighbors rescued her and the two children from the rubble, but now she lives in a tent.

The death toll from the earthquake in all regions of Syria reached 3,688 dead, and 14,749 injured, more than half of whom were in opposition-held areas.
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