Sudan : The battles continue amid al-Burhan's refusal to dialogue and calls for a truce on the eve of Eid al-Fitr Sudan : The battles continue amid al-Burhan's refusal to dialogue and calls for a truce on the eve of Eid al-Fitr

Sudan : The battles continue amid al-Burhan's refusal to dialogue and calls for a truce on the eve of Eid al-Fitr

Sudan : The battles continue amid al-Burhan's refusal to dialogue and calls for a truce on the eve of Eid al-Fitr  The commander of the Sudanese army, Abdel Fattah Al-Burhan, warned that "there is no choice but a military solution" if the Rapid Action Forces do not return to their positions. While the Secretary-General of the United Nations, Antonio Guterres, called on the two fighting parties to abide by a truce "for at least 3 days" on the occasion of Eid al-Fitr.  Gunfire and explosions continued in Khartoum on Thursday, on the eve of Eid al-Fitr, while the army commander, Lieutenant General Abdel Fattah al-Burhan, confirmed his refusal to "any talk about politics" with his former ally, who became his archenemy, the commander of the Rapid Support Forces, Muhammad Hamdan Dagalo.  While the international community is trying to extract a cease-fire from the commanders of the army and the Rapid Support Forces in their struggle for power, Al-Burhan warned in a telephone conversation with Al-Jazeera that "there is no choice but a military solution" if the Rapid Support Forces do not return to their positions in which they were stationed in December. last December.  At the same time, the army commander stressed his refusal to have any "direct" conversation with Daglo, nicknamed "Hemedti", hinting that the latter's personal aspirations to rule Sudan are the main motive for this conflict.  Between 10,000 and 20,000 people have fled the fighting in Sudan to seek refuge in neighboring Chad, according to UNHCR teams on the border.  United Nations Secretary-General Antonio Guterres, following a virtual meeting he held with officials from the African Union, the League of Arab States and other regional organizations, called on the two warring parties in Sudan to abide by a truce "for at least 3 days" on the occasion of Eid al-Fitr, which the Sudanese celebrate on Friday.  On Thursday evening, the Sudanese Fiqh Academy announced that "Friday is the first day of Eid al-Fitr."  "This should be the first step to allow a respite from the fighting and pave the way for a permanent ceasefire," Guterres added.  He emphasized that "the cessation of hostilities must be followed by serious dialogue to allow the success of a transitional process that begins with the appointment of a civilian government."  In turn, the US State Department urged, on Thursday, the two parties to the conflict in Sudan to extend the ceasefire until the end of the Eid al-Fitr holiday.  She said that Washington believed that the 24-hour ceasefire announced on Wednesday had largely held despite renewed heavy gunfire on Thursday.  Since April 15, Sudan has witnessed clashes between the army and the "Rapid Support Forces" in Khartoum and other cities, and the two sides exchanged accusations that each of them launched an attack on the headquarters of the other, in addition to allegations of controlling sites belonging to each of them.  The "Quick Support" was formed in 2013 to support government forces in their fight against the rebel movements in the Darfur region, and then assumed tasks, including combating irregular migration and maintaining security, before the army described it as "rebel" after the outbreak of clashes.

The commander of the Sudanese army, Abdel Fattah Al-Burhan, warned that "there is no choice but a military solution" if the Rapid Action Forces do not return to their positions. While the Secretary-General of the United Nations, Antonio Guterres, called on the two fighting parties to abide by a truce "for at least 3 days" on the occasion of Eid al-Fitr.

Gunfire and explosions continued in Khartoum on Thursday, on the eve of Eid al-Fitr, while the army commander, Lieutenant General Abdel Fattah al-Burhan, confirmed his refusal to "any talk about politics" with his former ally, who became his archenemy, the commander of the Rapid Support Forces, Muhammad Hamdan Dagalo.

While the international community is trying to extract a cease-fire from the commanders of the army and the Rapid Support Forces in their struggle for power, Al-Burhan warned in a telephone conversation with Al-Jazeera that "there is no choice but a military solution" if the Rapid Support Forces do not return to their positions in which they were stationed in December. last December.

At the same time, the army commander stressed his refusal to have any "direct" conversation with Daglo, nicknamed "Hemedti", hinting that the latter's personal aspirations to rule Sudan are the main motive for this conflict.

Between 10,000 and 20,000 people have fled the fighting in Sudan to seek refuge in neighboring Chad, according to UNHCR teams on the border.

United Nations Secretary-General Antonio Guterres, following a virtual meeting he held with officials from the African Union, the League of Arab States and other regional organizations, called on the two warring parties in Sudan to abide by a truce "for at least 3 days" on the occasion of Eid al-Fitr, which the Sudanese celebrate on Friday.

On Thursday evening, the Sudanese Fiqh Academy announced that "Friday is the first day of Eid al-Fitr."

"This should be the first step to allow a respite from the fighting and pave the way for a permanent ceasefire," Guterres added.

He emphasized that "the cessation of hostilities must be followed by serious dialogue to allow the success of a transitional process that begins with the appointment of a civilian government."

In turn, the US State Department urged, on Thursday, the two parties to the conflict in Sudan to extend the ceasefire until the end of the Eid al-Fitr holiday.

She said that Washington believed that the 24-hour ceasefire announced on Wednesday had largely held despite renewed heavy gunfire on Thursday.

Since April 15, Sudan has witnessed clashes between the army and the "Rapid Support Forces" in Khartoum and other cities, and the two sides exchanged accusations that each of them launched an attack on the headquarters of the other, in addition to allegations of controlling sites belonging to each of them.

The "Quick Support" was formed in 2013 to support government forces in their fight against the rebel movements in the Darfur region, and then assumed tasks, including combating irregular migration and maintaining security, before the army described it as "rebel" after the outbreak of clashes.






After the armistice Violent clashes between the Sudanese army and the Rapid Support Forces in the city of El-Obeid


For the sixth day in a row, clashes continue between the Sudanese army and the Rapid Support Forces. The city of Al-Obeid woke up this morning, Thursday, to violent clashes, despite the entry into force of the truce.

Violent clashes erupted between the Sudanese army and the Rapid Support Forces, Thursday, in the city of El-Obeid, the center of North Kordofan state (center).

Eyewitnesses told Anatolia that violent clashes broke out between the Sudanese army and the Rapid Support Forces in the city's large market, and the vicinity of the army's Fifth Infantry Division.

He explained that "a large force from the Rapid Support Forces entered the city of Al-Obeid and clashed with the army."

Since April 15, Sudan has witnessed clashes between the two sides in Khartoum and other cities, and the two sides exchanged accusations that each of them launched an attack on the headquarters of the other, in addition to allegations of controlling sites belonging to each of them.

The "Quick Support" was formed in 2013 to support government forces in their fight against the rebel movements in the Darfur region, and then assumed tasks, including combating irregular migration and maintaining security, before the army described it as "rebel" after the outbreak of clashes.
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