Scientific research : Eating grapes alters the gut microbiome

Journal eBioMedicine : Researchers identify a gene expression signature that predicts the development of type 1 diabetes Healthy diet : A nutritionist reveals a way to live 100 years  Scientific research : Eating grapes alters the gut microbiome Scientists from Western New England University have discovered that eating grapes changes the gut microbiome and improves health.  Scientific Reports magazine indicates that university scientists focused in this study on the effect of grapes on the gut microbiome, as it is known that the intestine contains billions of microorganisms that affect public health.  This study lasted eight weeks, in which 29 volunteers of both sexes (men 29-53 years old) and women (24-55 years old) participated, and they were asked to limit their diet for two weeks, after which they ate grapes three times a day for two weeks as well. So exclude it from the diet.  The results showed that the amount of bacteria in the intestine, the level of enzymes and biological pathways after eating grapes changed positively, which affected the condition of the heart, colon, brain and general health indicators. For example, on the 30th day of the experiment (after eating grapes), the level of Streptococcus thermophiles—a probiotic that produces lactic acid—in the intestines was high, while the number of Holdemania bacteria decreased, as happens in those who follow a vegetarian diet. When comparing the 30-day period with the 60-day period, a continuous increase in the number of organisms associated with the production of metabolites was observed.    Healthy diet : A nutritionist reveals a way to live 100 years Dr. Vasilisa Panomaryova, a Russian nutritionist, announced that a healthy and correct diet helps to live up to 100 years.  The expert points out that following a healthy and correct diet, as in the “blue zones” (the Blue Zone is a new term to identify the few regions in the world that are characterized by long-lived populations compared to the average lifespan in the rest of the world) helps to increase the average lifespan. Expected by 13 years, ie live to 100 years.  "We have confirmed that a healthy diet can positively affect longevity and health," she says.  The expert refers to scientific studies that took place in regions of the world that are characterized by the longevity of their population, as they maintain good health longer than others. What is meant here are the "blue zones" from Okinawa to Sardinia and from Nicoya to Ikaria, whose inhabitants consume large quantities of vegetables, fruits, whole grains and legumes.  According to her, these particular foodstuffs are rich in nutrients that reduce the risk of health problems such as heart disease and stroke.  And she adds: It is important here not only to add these healthy foodstuffs to the diet, but also to avoid eating harmful foods as well.  "It turns out that people in the 'blue zones' don't consume a lot of meat, dairy, refined sugar, and processed foods," she says.  And she adds: "In general, the diet of the residents of the "blue zones" depends on plants, and in particular on legumes, as a primary source of protein."     Journal eBioMedicine : Researchers identify a gene expression signature that predicts the development of type 1 diabetes In a study published in the journal eBioMedicine, researchers have identified a gene expression signature that can predict the development of type 1 diabetes. The study, led by Professor Laura Ello and Professor Rita Lahisma from the University of Turku in Finland, aimed to identify transcriptional changes associated with disease progression in patients with newly-onset type 1 diabetes.  The researchers analyzed blood samples collected as part of the global INNODIA partnership. A specific gene expression signature was found to be associated with the rapid progression of the disease.  The researchers explain : “One benefit of this predictive signature is the ability to intervene earlier in the disease process. This can help slow disease progression and potentially prevent or delay the onset of symptoms. Another benefit is improved monitoring of disease progression, which would It allows for more personalized treatment plans and better patient outcomes."  Type 1 diabetes is a complex autoimmune disease in which the insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas are destroyed. Disease progression varies between individuals and there is currently no way to predict individual outcome.  INNODIA is a global partnership of 31 academic institutions, 6 industry partners, a small-scale foundation and two patient organizations, with the common goal of fighting type 1 diabetes.  INNODIA researchers examined samples and data from patients newly diagnosed with type 1 diabetes and their unaffected first-degree relatives across Europe.  By analyzing RNA-seq data in the blood of 92 participants, the team found increased levels of B cells and decreased levels of neutrophils in patients with the rapidly developing condition. Furthermore, the study identified a gene expression signature that could predict the development of type 1 diabetes, and found associations between gene expression changes and positivity for the ZnT8A autoantibody (an independent marker for the diagnosis of type 1 diabetes).  The researchers identified a signature of 16 genes that could predict disease progression. Identification of such a predictive genetic signature can help determine more personalized clinical and treatment interventions for each patient.

Scientists from Western New England University have discovered that eating grapes changes the gut microbiome and improves health.

Scientific Reports magazine indicates that university scientists focused in this study on the effect of grapes on the gut microbiome, as it is known that the intestine contains billions of microorganisms that affect public health.

This study lasted eight weeks, in which 29 volunteers of both sexes (men 29-53 years old) and women (24-55 years old) participated, and they were asked to limit their diet for two weeks, after which they ate grapes three times a day for two weeks as well. So exclude it from the diet.

The results showed that the amount of bacteria in the intestine, the level of enzymes and biological pathways after eating grapes changed positively, which affected the condition of the heart, colon, brain and general health indicators. For example, on the 30th day of the experiment (after eating grapes), the level of Streptococcus thermophiles—a probiotic that produces lactic acid—in the intestines was high, while the number of Holdemania bacteria decreased, as happens in those who follow a vegetarian diet. When comparing the 30-day period with the 60-day period, a continuous increase in the number of organisms associated with the production of metabolites was observed.


Healthy diet : A nutritionist reveals a way to live 100 years

Dr. Vasilisa Panomaryova, a Russian nutritionist, announced that a healthy and correct diet helps to live up to 100 years.

The expert points out that following a healthy and correct diet, as in the “blue zones” (the Blue Zone is a new term to identify the few regions in the world that are characterized by long-lived populations compared to the average lifespan in the rest of the world) helps to increase the average lifespan. Expected by 13 years, ie live to 100 years.

"We have confirmed that a healthy diet can positively affect longevity and health," she says.

The expert refers to scientific studies that took place in regions of the world that are characterized by the longevity of their population, as they maintain good health longer than others. What is meant here are the "blue zones" from Okinawa to Sardinia and from Nicoya to Ikaria, whose inhabitants consume large quantities of vegetables, fruits, whole grains and legumes.

According to her, these particular foodstuffs are rich in nutrients that reduce the risk of health problems such as heart disease and stroke.

And she adds: It is important here not only to add these healthy foodstuffs to the diet, but also to avoid eating harmful foods as well.

"It turns out that people in the 'blue zones' don't consume a lot of meat, dairy, refined sugar, and processed foods," she says.

And she adds: "In general, the diet of the residents of the "blue zones" depends on plants, and in particular on legumes, as a primary source of protein."



Journal eBioMedicine : Researchers identify a gene expression signature that predicts the development of type 1 diabetes

In a study published in the journal eBioMedicine, researchers have identified a gene expression signature that can predict the development of type 1 diabetes.
The study, led by Professor Laura Ello and Professor Rita Lahisma from the University of Turku in Finland, aimed to identify transcriptional changes associated with disease progression in patients with newly-onset type 1 diabetes.

The researchers analyzed blood samples collected as part of the global INNODIA partnership. A specific gene expression signature was found to be associated with the rapid progression of the disease.

The researchers explain : “One benefit of this predictive signature is the ability to intervene earlier in the disease process. This can help slow disease progression and potentially prevent or delay the onset of symptoms. Another benefit is improved monitoring of disease progression, which would It allows for more personalized treatment plans and better patient outcomes."

Type 1 diabetes is a complex autoimmune disease in which the insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas are destroyed. Disease progression varies between individuals and there is currently no way to predict individual outcome.

INNODIA is a global partnership of 31 academic institutions, 6 industry partners, a small-scale foundation and two patient organizations, with the common goal of fighting type 1 diabetes.

INNODIA researchers examined samples and data from patients newly diagnosed with type 1 diabetes and their unaffected first-degree relatives across Europe.

By analyzing RNA-seq data in the blood of 92 participants, the team found increased levels of B cells and decreased levels of neutrophils in patients with the rapidly developing condition. Furthermore, the study identified a gene expression signature that could predict the development of type 1 diabetes, and found associations between gene expression changes and positivity for the ZnT8A autoantibody (an independent marker for the diagnosis of type 1 diabetes).

The researchers identified a signature of 16 genes that could predict disease progression. Identification of such a predictive genetic signature can help determine more personalized clinical and treatment interventions for each patient.

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